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Given the following classes

class Parent
  def hello
    puts "I am the parent class"
  end

  def call_parent_hello
    hello
  end
end

class Child < Parent
  def hello
    puts "I am the child class"
  end
end

When I do the following:

c = Child.new
c.hello             # => Outputs: "I am the child class"
c.call_parent_hello # => Outputs: "I am the child class"

Is it possible to make Child#call_parent_hello access the Parent#hello, but without altering the Parent class?

I am looking for some kind of called_by_parent_class? implementation like this:

def hello
  if called_by_parent_class?
    super
  else
    puts "I am the child class"
  end
end
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3 Answers 3

You can use the super keyword:

class Child < Parent
  def hello
    super
  end
end
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This would output "I am the parent class" 2 times. I want the first call to output "I am the child class" and the second one to print "I am the parent class". –  iblue Jul 7 '12 at 17:28
    
OIC. Well, I just misnamed the method then, you need to override call_parent_hello. The key is that the answer to your question is "use the super keyword!" You might enjoy reading this article on Ruby's method lookup process blog.rubybestpractices.com/posts/gregory/… –  Larry OBrien Jul 7 '12 at 17:44
    
(Looking at your updated "What I am looking for..." question) -- You could use Kernel.caller (but in almost all cases it is a design mistake) –  Larry OBrien Jul 7 '12 at 17:50
    
Yes, I had this idea as well, but discarded it, because -- you are absolutely right -- this would be a too evil hack. (caller.select{|x| x =~ /Parent/}.size > 0... no thanks. :)) –  iblue Jul 7 '12 at 17:59

I think you're looking to do something like this:

class Parent
  def hello( opts = '' )
    "Who's talking? The #{self.class} class is via the Parent class!"
  end
end

class Child < Parent

  def hello( opts = '' )
    if opts == 'super'
      super 
    else
      "I have a parent and an independent voice"
    end
  end

  def call_mom
    hello( 'super' )
  end

end

c1 = Child.new

puts c1.hello     => "I have a parent and an independent voice"
puts c1.call_mom  => "Who's talking? The Child class is via the Parent class!"

However (and I'm not trolling here) I also think you're kind of missing the point of subclassing. Generally you would subclass to get this automatic scoping of methods. If you break out of that I think you would want to instantiate an instance of Parent. But to each his own.

Good luck!

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The point here is, that I have an ActiveRecord model. An Invoice containing multiple items. I can mark items as deleted and I want the items method in my Invoice class not to return the marked as deleted items anymore. However, the superclass still needs to see the the deleted items so it can actually delete them. This is why I can't modify the parent class. –  iblue Jul 7 '12 at 20:44
    
Again not trolling... I'm just trying to understand the problem. Can't you achieve this behavior with a "deleted" column in the child object and scope defined called deleted. Then in the parent model call "Child.deleted". This sounds more like it is an association issue vs. a proper subclassing. Again, I don't know your particular problem but in my experience the most common use of SubClassing in Rails is two models that are almost the same but the children have extra attributes. (aka STI) For instance a newspaper Article could be subclassed into OpEd and Feature –  engineerDave Jul 8 '12 at 17:55
    
It's not about a deleted column. I am using mark_for_destruction to hack some strange MongoDB-style behavior into ActiveRecord. I solved this now by using caller. See line 52 of this gist: gist.github.com/3072127 –  iblue Jul 8 '12 at 18:16
  1. Use super. super calls the same method in the parent class

    class Child < Parent
      def call_parent_hello
        super
      end
    end
    
  2. Use direct hierarchy call. Class#ancestors gives you the hierarchy of the inheritance.

    class Child < Parent
      def call_parent_hello
        self.class.ancestors[1].new.hello
      end
    end
    
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Actually I am looking for some kind of def hello; if called_by_parent_class?; super; else puts "I am the child class"; end –  iblue Jul 7 '12 at 17:34
    
Called by parent class? –  texasbruce Jul 7 '12 at 18:07

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