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I would like to know if it's possible to do the following thing only using awk: I am searching some regex in a file Fand I want to replace the string (S1) that matches the regex by another string (S2). Of course, it's easy to do that with awk. But ... my problem is that the value of S2 has to be obtained from another file that maps S1 to S2.

Example :

file F:

abcd 168.0.0.1 qsqsjsdfjsjdf
sdfsdffsd
168.0.0.2 sqqsfjqsfsdf

my associative table in another file

168.0.0.1 foo
168.0.0.2 bar

I want to get:

this result:

abcd foo qsqsjsdfjsjdf
sdfsdffsd
bar sqqsfjqsfsdf

Thanks for help !

edit: if my input file is a bit different, like this (no space before IP address):

file F:

abcd168.0.0.1 qsqsjsdfjsjdf
sdfsdffsd
168.0.0.2 sqqsfjqsfsdf

i can't use $1, $2 variables and search in the associative array. I tried something like that (based on birei proposition) but it did not work :

FNR < NR {
    sub(/[0-9]+\.[0-9]+\.[0-9]+\.[0-9]+/, assoc [ & ] );
    print
}

Is there a way to search the matched string in the associative array (assoc[ & ] seems to be not valid) ?

share|improve this question
    
If it is a one-off problem, put the table in the BEGIN section and query it then with your awk script. E.g., BEGIN { t[x1] = y; t[x2] = y; ... } { if ($1 in t) ...; } –  Matthias Vallentin Jul 7 '12 at 18:31

1 Answer 1

One way. It's self-explanatory. Save data from the associative table in an array and in second file check for each field if it matches any key of the array:

awk '
    FNR == NR {
        assoc[ $1 ] = $2;
        next;
    }
    FNR < NR {
        for ( i = 1; i <= NF; i++ ) {
            if ( $i in assoc ) {
                $i = assoc[ $i ]
            }
        }
        print
    }
' associative_file F

Output:

bcd foo qsqsjsdfjsjdf                                                                                                                                                                                                                        
sdfsdffsd                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    
bar sqqsfjqsfsdf

EDIT: Try following awk script for IPs without spaces with their surrounding words. It's similar to previous one, but now it searches in the array and try to find an IP in any place of the line (default $0 for gsub) and substitutes it.

awk '
    FNR == NR {
        assoc[ $1 ] = $2;
        next;
    }
    FNR < NR {
        for ( key in assoc ) {
            gsub( key, assoc[ key ] )
        }
        print
    }
' associative_file F

Assuming infile with the conten of your second example of file F, output would be:

abcdfoo qsqsjsdfjsjdf                                                                                                                                                                                                                        
sdfsdffsd                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    
bar sqqsfjqsfsdf
share|improve this answer
1  
You should do if (i in assoc) instead of if (assoc[$i]) because the latter creates an entry in the array simply by referring to it. You can omit the FNR < NR selector since it will always be true (because of the next). You can omit the $0 = $0 since the $i = assignments do any field recomputing necessary. –  Dennis Williamson Jul 7 '12 at 19:16
    
@DennisWilliamson: Thank you. Good suggestions. I like the explicit comparison of FNR < NR, so I left it in the code. Others I agree that can be considered flaws, so I modified them. –  Birei Jul 7 '12 at 19:22
    
thanks a lot ! it solved my problem and I learn that I have many things to learn about awk. so powerful tool ... –  jean Jul 7 '12 at 21:01
    
I added a small modification to the input file and I am now looking for a small modification to Birei proposition –  jean Jul 7 '12 at 23:29
    
@jean: I edited the answer but I suggest you to remove this answer as the accepted one at this time because the question is not solved yet and could avoid that some users also try to provide other solutions. –  Birei Jul 7 '12 at 23:47

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