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is the following code 100% correct? I'm coding a game and CItemElem is a class that holds Item informations, such as power etc. I want to store pointers from the items into an instance of another class named CChatLink. Please have a look:

[.H]

#pragma once

class CChatLink
{
private:
    CChatLink(){}; //no new usage or global object allowed
    ~CChatLink(){}; 
public:
    BOOL InsertChatLink( TCHAR* szText, CItemElem *pItemElem );
    map<std::string,CItemElem*>m_mChatLink;
    static CChatLink* GetInstance( void )
    {
        static CChatLink pObj;
        return &pObj;

    }

};

[.cpp]

#include "StdAfx.h"
#include "Item.h"
#include "CChatLink.h"

BOOL CChatLink::InsertChatLink( TCHAR *szText, CItemElem* pItemElem )
{
    if( pItemElem && szText )
    {
        std::string szInsert( szText );
        CItemElem *pItem = new CItemElem; //as far as I know, it must be allocated on the heap to be inserted ^^
        pItem = pItemElem;
        m_mChatLink.insert( make_pair( szInsert, pItem ) );
        return TRUE;
    }
    return FALSE;
}

Can I store the std::string into the map that way?

(I'm currently studying C++ so please go easy on me.)

share|improve this question
    
I see a new without a delete. So yes, you probably have a memory leak. – Mysticial Jul 7 '12 at 18:22
    
You allocate initialize pItem CItemElem *pItem = new ..., then trash it right away with pItem = pItemElem;, thats a leak right there – nhed Jul 7 '12 at 18:25
    
Guys you must understand I can't store an object allocated on the stack into the map because it will cause undefined behavior, and I'll explicitly delete the allocated pointer later. What is the best method to insert the pointer into the map? – Vinicius Horta Jul 7 '12 at 18:30
up vote 4 down vote accepted

Yes you have a memory leak right here:

CItemElem *pItem = new CItemElem;
pItem = pItemElem;

You just lost the address to where the object was allocated. Why are you doing this anyways if the item to be inserted is being passed as an argument? It is not clear from your code.

Is this what you meant instead?:

BOOL CChatLink::InsertChatLink( TCHAR *szText, CItemElem* pItemElem )
{
    if( pItemElem && szText )
    {
        std::string szInsert( szText );
        m_mChatLink.insert( make_pair( szInsert, pItemElem ) );
        return TRUE;
    }
    return FALSE;
}

EDIT:

It sounds like pItemElem is a pointer to an object that has been allocated on the stack. You could either change m_mChatLink to a std::map<std::string, CItemElem> (not a CItemElem*) OR this:

CItemElem pItem = new CItemElem;
*pItem = *pItemElem;
m_mChatLink.insert(make_pair(szInsert, pItem));

You will need to delete all these CItemElems in your destructor.

share|improve this answer
    
how should I do it sir? – Vinicius Horta Jul 7 '12 at 18:27
    
Inserting the parsed pointer into the map won't modify the pointer itself later by other CChatLink functions? What if the parsed pointer wasn't allocated on the heap and I insert it into the map? – Vinicius Horta Jul 7 '12 at 18:33
1  
*pItem = *pItemElem changes the value of what resides at the memory address of pItem. Yes, it will be a copy. However, you still need to delete all the allocated cItemElems in the map in your destructor. – Marlon Jul 7 '12 at 18:37
1  
pItem = pItemElem changes the memory address that pItem holds. *pItem = *pItemElem changes the value at the memory address that pItem is currently holding. – Marlon Jul 7 '12 at 18:41
1  
(1) Yes that is correct if SAFE_DELETE is just delete and not delete[]. (2) memcpy just copies the memory byte by byte. It won't invoke the copy constructor. It has the potential to be unsafe and you should only use it if you know what you are doing. I would suggest avoiding it in this case. – Marlon Jul 7 '12 at 18:54

The string is fine, but here:

CItemElem *pItem = new CItemElem;

you are creating a dynamically allocated CItemElem that never gets deleted. In fact, you lose the handle on it immediately here:

pItem = pItemElem;

You must make sure that the pointer you insert into the map poijnts to the right object, and, if this object is dynamically allocates, then your class must take care of deleting this element when necessary, for example when an element is removed from the map, or when the CChatLink class itself is destroyed.

Given that the signature of your insertion method is this:

BOOL InsertChatLink( TCHAR* szText, CItemElem *pItemElem );

then there are two options:

  1. The caller owns the pointed to object, so your class does not need to worry about deleting it. But in this case, the pointed to object must live at least as long as your CChatLink instance. This must be well documented.
  2. Your CChatLink class takes ownership. In that case, it is responsible for deleting, and the caller must be aware of that. This must be well documented.

You should have a look at smart pointers, which provide automatic management for different ownership scenarios (unique ownership, as in the example above, shared ownership, no ownership).

Another option is to forget about the pointers entirely and stor the CItemElems by value:

class CChatLink {
  std::map<std::string, CItemElem> m_mChatLink;
 public:
  BOOL InsertChatLink( TCHAR* szText, const CItemElem& item ) {
    ...
    m_mChatLink.insert( make_pair( szInsert, item ) );
    ...
  }
};
share|improve this answer
    
You mean I must make sure pItem that is stored on the map is a safe pointer in case the real object got deleted? – Vinicius Horta Jul 7 '12 at 18:28
    
@ViniciusHorta it depends on who "owns" the pointed-to object. I expanded my answer. But whatever the ownership, you must avoid situations where the object is not deleted, or it gets deleted unexpectedly. – juanchopanza Jul 7 '12 at 18:35

There's no memory leak with the string because std::string properly manages its own memory. You do have a leak with CItemElem: you're creating it but never deleting it (at least in the shown code).

There are a few options:

  • Explicitly delete the CItemElem instances when you remove them from the chat link.
  • Use a smart pointer to manage the CItemElem pointer. Some popular choices of smart pointer implementations include:

Note that you won't want to use std::auto_ptr because it can't be added to a C++ standard library container.

share|improve this answer

When you are allocating dynamic memory in a class. You need to write a copy constructor and assignment operator. If you don't the pointers get copied/assigned, and memory gets deleted twice at destructor time.

share|improve this answer

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