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I'm making requests to the remote server and sometimes requests fail because of the unreliable network. In case of fail I want request to repeat, but n times at max. If I were using imperative language, I would place request-sending code in a while-loop, but I want to do it in a functional way.

I've wrote helper for this purpose:

/** Repeatedly executes function `f` 
  * while predicate `p` holds
  * but no more than `nTries` times.
  */
def repeatWhile[A](f: => A)(p: A => Boolean)(nTries: Int): Option[A] =
  if (nTries == 0) {
    None
  } else {
    f match {
      case a if p(a) => repeatWhile(f)(p)(nTries - 1)
      case a         => Some(a)
    }
  }

And using it like this:

// Emulating unreliable connection
var n = 0
def receive(): Option[String] =
  if (n < 4) {
    n += 1
    println("No result...")
    None
  } else {
    println("Result!")
    Some("Result")
  }

// Repeated call
val result = repeatWhile(receive)(!_.isDefined)(10)

where receive is a silly function for testing purposes. This code makes 4 calls before receive finally succeeds with Some(Result):

No result...
No result...
No result...
No result...
Result!

My repeatWhile works fine, but I feel like reinventing the wheel. I'm studying functional programming and want to know if there are simple/standard solutions to my problem.

P.s. I've defined even more helpers, maybe they are already in language/standard library?

/** Repeatedly executes function `f` 
  * while predicated `p` not holds
  * but no more than `nTries` times.
  */
def repeatWhileNot[A](f: => A)(p: A => Boolean)(nTries:Int): Option[A] = 
  repeatWhile(f)(!p(_))(nTries)

/** Repeatedly executes function `f` 
  * while it returns None 
  * but no more than `nTries` times.
  */
def repeatWhileNone[A](f: => Option[A])(nTries:Int): Option[A] = 
  repeatWhileNot(f)(_.isDefined)(nTries).getOrElse(None)
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1 Answer 1

up vote 14 down vote accepted

The canonical way would be to use an Iterator:

Iterator.continually{f}.take(nTries).dropWhile(!p).take(1).toList

which will give you either an empty list or a one-item list, depending on whether it was successful. You can convert this to an option with headOption if you so desire. With minor modifications this works on all your use cases.

Writing small recursive methods as you've done is perfectly sensible also, though they aren't in the library. In general, writing helper methods for what you do most is a very good idea. This is one reason why Scala makes it so easy to write methods.

share|improve this answer
2  
Thank you! It can be written even shorter as Iterator.continually(f).take(nTries).find(p). –  lambdas Jul 7 '12 at 19:04
1  
Is it possible to use Stream instead of Iterator? What's the difference? –  lambdas Jul 7 '12 at 19:05
    
@lpaul7 Stream will always compute the current element. Just creating it will cause it to call the function once. –  Kaito Jul 7 '12 at 19:25
2  
@lpaul7 Stream.fill(nTries)(f).find(p) is even shorter! I would prefer Streams since they're immutable. @Kaito, that doesn't matter in this context since we're evaluting at least the head immediately anyway. If you don't want to eagerly evaluate the head, you can assign the Stream to a lazy val. –  Luigi Plinge Jul 7 '12 at 20:21
1  
@LuigiPlinge True, it doesn't matter in this case but it's a difference and it may matter in other cases. Using a lazy val works only once. Doing Stream:drop(1) will still cause it compute 2 items, while Iterator:drop(1) will compute only 1. (Arguably it shouldn't compute anything in either case) –  Kaito Jul 7 '12 at 23:11

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