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I would like to write a time stamp and string pair to file in the most compact way possible. I started out writing the string representation of Ticks, then ASCII 31 as a seperator, then the string, then a CR.

Then I realised that as ticks is a long and can be stored as only 8 bytes I should convert ticks to bytes and write those bytes to the file. That's fine except those timestamp bytes might contain a byte whose value is 31 so my ASCII 31 delimiter is no longer unique.

What is the most compact way to store a timestamp and string pair to file?

Thanks.

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Since Ticks has a fixed maximum length, you could avoid using the separator, reading the first 8 bytes of the Tick and then reading the remaining bytes as the string. –  acondolu Jul 7 '12 at 18:40
    
Of course! Perfect. Thank you. Can you convert your comment to an answer so I can accept it? –  Guy Jul 7 '12 at 19:02

1 Answer 1

Since Ticks has a fixed maximum length, you could avoid using the separator, reading the first 8 bytes of Ticks data and then reading the remaining bytes as the string. :)

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Oh and remember to pad the value if necessary! –  acondolu Jul 7 '12 at 19:32
    
Pad the long? But it will always be 8 bytes won't it? What should I pad? –  Guy Jul 7 '12 at 21:56
    
Actually, I don't think this approach is going to work. I am using a CR to delimit the timestamp/string pair but I can't gaurantee that a CR won't appear in the timestamp. If I pad the string to be fixed width (which I am guessing is what you are referring to in your comment) I will waste a lot of space as the string length is highly variable. –  Guy Jul 7 '12 at 22:40
    
No I actually meant to pad the long to 8 bytes, when necessary... About the string, are there some assumptions on the content - is it human readable? –  acondolu Jul 7 '12 at 22:51
    
Kind of. They are NMEA0183 sentences, an ASCII subset of characters representing 6 bit values, all printable so I know they will not contain CR or other non-printable characters. –  Guy Jul 7 '12 at 23:52

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