Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

What is the best strategy to create a screen part of a java swing application, that repaints itself every minute with new information from a web page? (A yahoo stock quote for example) Thank you.

share|improve this question

5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted

1. Create a Separate thread apart from the GUI thread(ie Event Dispatcher Thread).

2. Make it call the service that give the yahoo stock with delay of 60 sec, use Thread.sleep(60000);

3. call repaint();

Edited:

new Thread(new Runnable(){

   public void run(){

    try{
          while (true){

        Thread.sleep(60000);
        yahoo() // CALL TO YAHOO SENSEX 

        repaint();
          }
       }catch(Exception ex){

         }
 }).start();
share|improve this answer
    
Can you give a small example on this?Thnx. –  skiabox Jul 7 '12 at 19:23
    
So where do I put this code?Inside the main JFrame Window ? –  skiabox Jul 7 '12 at 19:38
    
java.awt.EventQueue.invokeLater(new Runnable() { public void run() { new MainForm().setVisible(true); } }); –  skiabox Jul 7 '12 at 19:39
    
You can put the code i wrote into a method..and then call it just once from main() after EventQueue.invokeLater, then it will keep looping.. i have not added here any mechanism to stop it.. you can do that using boolean.. –  Kumar Vivek Mitra Jul 7 '12 at 19:42
1  
please use invokeLater inside the thread to update GUI components as exemplified here. This is safer to avoid concurrence problems. –  Francisco Spaeth Jul 7 '12 at 19:44

Use Timer with TimerTask classes to do some action on regular basis. And send "update" event to view-component (in MVC-notation) of your application.

share|improve this answer

Probably the best solution in use a new thread, that download information & repaints itself..

share|improve this answer

You could start a new Thread and in this thread execution you could put events on the event stack as exposed on the sample below. It is more safe to implement this way because the GUI update will be invoked from the event dispatch thread. More information here.

import javax.swing.JFrame;
import javax.swing.JLabel;
import javax.swing.SwingUtilities;

public class SpringcConc {

    final static JLabel label = new JLabel("INITIALIZED ...");

    public static void main(final String[] s) {

        SwingUtilities.invokeLater(new Runnable() {
            public void run() {
                JFrame myJframe = new JFrame();
                myJframe.add(label);
                myJframe.pack();
                myJframe.setVisible(true);
                instituteThreads();
            }
        });

    }

    protected static void instituteThreads() {
        Thread queryThread1 = new Thread() {
            @Override
            public void run() {
                while (true) {
                    try {
                        sleep(500);
                    } catch (InterruptedException e) {
                        e.printStackTrace();
                    }
                    SwingUtilities.invokeLater(new Runnable() {
                        public void run() {
                            label.setText("THREAD 1 UPD");
                        }
                    });
                }
            }
        };
        queryThread1.start();
        Thread queryThread2 = new Thread() {
            @Override
            public void run() {
                while (true) {
                    try {
                        sleep(750);
                    } catch (InterruptedException e) {
                        e.printStackTrace();
                    }
                    SwingUtilities.invokeLater(new Runnable() {
                        public void run() {
                            label.setText("THREAD 2 UPD");
                        }
                    });
                }
            }
        };
        queryThread2.start();
    }

}

Another approach would be using Timer:

import java.awt.event.ActionEvent;
import java.awt.event.ActionListener;

import javax.swing.JFrame;
import javax.swing.JLabel;
import javax.swing.SwingUtilities;
import javax.swing.Timer;

public class SwingTimer {

    public static void main(final String[] args) {
        final JLabel label = new JLabel("INITIALIZED");
        SwingUtilities.invokeLater(new Runnable() {
            public void run() {
                JFrame jFrame = new JFrame();
                jFrame.add(label);
                jFrame.pack();
                jFrame.setVisible(true);
                jFrame.setBounds(200, 200, 100, 50);
            }
        });
        new Timer(500, new ActionListener() {
            public void actionPerformed(final ActionEvent e) {
                label.setText("UPDATE 1");
            }
        }).start();
        new Timer(750, new ActionListener() {
            public void actionPerformed(final ActionEvent e) {
                label.setText("UPDATE 2");
            }
        }).start();
    }

}
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you, I'll try it. –  skiabox Jul 7 '12 at 19:43
    
I just updated the sample, you can put into the run method. –  Francisco Spaeth Jul 7 '12 at 19:46

Instead of a separate thread or java.util.Timer, use javax.swing.Timer to pace the updates to your data model, as shown here. The advantage is that a "Swing timer's task is performed in the event dispatch thread."

image

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.