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That is, can you send

{
  "registration_ids": ["whatever", ...],
  "data": {
    "foo": {
      "bar": {
        "baz": [42]
      }
    }
  }
}

or is the "data" member of the GCM request restricted to one level of key-value pairs? I ask b/c that limitation is suggested by the wording in Google's doc[1], where it says "data" is:

A JSON object whose fields represents the key-value pairs of the message's payload data. If present, the payload data it will be included in the Intent as application data, with the key being the extra's name. For instance, "data":{"score":"3x1"} would result in an intent extra named score whose value is the string 3x1 There is no limit on the number of key/value pairs, though there is a limit on the total size of the message. Optional.

[1] http://developer.android.com/guide/google/gcm/gcm.html#request

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value could be another jsonObject , so i think it should be possible for a deep data field, there is only size restriction on data, but not any format restriction. –  Yashwanth Kumar Jul 7 '12 at 19:53
    
I think it's likely that when onMessage is called, calling intent.getExtra("foo") will give you "{ "bar" : { "baz" :[42] } }" string. You can then parse it as a JSON string. Best is to try it out yourself. –  azgolfer Jul 7 '12 at 20:15
    
Exactly. That is all totally reasonable speculation, which is why I'm looking for an answer from someone that has actually tried something like this. :) The question is not so much "what is valid JSON?" as it is "what will Google actually propagate?" or at least "are there clarifying docs from Google?". –  Rob Starling Jul 7 '12 at 22:55
    
Have you tried it? Can you actually pass an JSON Array? –  tasomaniac Jul 8 '12 at 16:42
    
@azgolfer is this correct intent.getExtra("foo")? intent.getExtra() does not except an argument, atleast till 2.2. –  Gaurav Agarwal Jul 27 '12 at 21:50

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Just did a test myself and confirmed my conjecture.

Send a GCM to myself with this payload:

{
  "registration_ids": ["whatever", ...],
  "data": {
     "message": {
        "bar": {
           "baz": [42]
        }
     }
  }
}

And my client received it and parse the 'message' intent extra as this:

handleMessage - message={        "bar": {          "baz": [42]        }      }  

So the you can indeed do further JSON parsing on the value of a data key.

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Scuse me if I'm wrong, Map<String, String> denotes key=string and value=string.

If string is a long unreasonable json extract which is UTF-8 formatted and well escaped. It stands to reason that should you call new JSONObject(receivedString); and it works then all other json calls follow.

Do not forget that raw JSON is a string! We do not need google to clarify how to work with strings..this is why your test worked!

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The question isn't about how to handle maps and strings in java, but rather how google stores these things internally and what they will support. –  Rob Starling May 14 '13 at 17:29
    
My Belief is that google should not be storing your data but rather passing them directly to a message queue. I ran a test and currently our app sends JSON to google as the value of the message. I can assure your the JSON is nested and to date no message has been lost. @Rob –  Lettings Mall May 19 '13 at 20:03

Although it appears to work (see other answers and comments), without a clear statement from Google, i would not recommend relying on it as their documentation consistently refers to the top-level members of the json as "key-value pairs". The server-side helper jar they provide [1] also reinforces this idea, as it models the user data as a Map<String, String>. Their Message.Builder.addData method doesn't even support non-string values, so even though booleans, numbers, and null are representable in json, i'd be cautious using those, too.

If Google updates their backend code in a way that breaks this (arguably-unsupported) usage, apps that relied on it would need an update to continue to work. In order to be safe, i'm going to be using a single key-value pair whose value is a json-stringified deep object [2]. My data isn't very big, and i can afford the json-inside-json overhead, but ymmv. Also, one of my members is a variable-length list, and flattening those to key-value pairs is always ugly :)

[1] http://developer.android.com/guide/google/gcm/server-javadoc/index.html (The jar itself is only available from within the Android SDK in the gcm-server/dist directory, per http://developer.android.com/guide/google/gcm/gs.html#server-app )

[2] e.g. my whole payload will look something like this:

{
  "registration_ids": ["whatever", ...],
  "data": {
    "player": "{\"score\": 1234, \"new_achievements\": [\"hot foot\", \"nimble\"]}"
  }
}
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