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Is there a way to programmatically detect/determine if a binary (separate from my application) has been compiled i386, x86_x64, or both? I imagine there is a way (obviously), although I really have no idea how. Any suggestions or advice would be appreciated, thank you.

EDIT: I found an example on the Apple developer website, although it's written in C and setup to be used more as a command line tool. If anyone would know how to implement it into my objective-c code that would be extremely helpful.

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You can parse the output of file or objdump. – Mahmoud Al-Qudsi Jul 7 '12 at 19:34
    
2  
@grahamparks, that appears to only detect what the architecture the application itself (with that code) is running. I'm trying to detect that of a completely different binary unrelated to my application. – Joe Habadas Jul 7 '12 at 19:54
    
I found some C code from the apple developer samples, although I'm not sure how to integrate it with my objective-c code. – Joe Habadas Jul 8 '12 at 1:52

You can include the mach-o headers and simply load the binary and then check the mach_header. You should read the Mach-O format description from Apple for more info, it includes everything you need: http://developer.apple.com/library/mac/#documentation/DeveloperTools/Conceptual/MachORuntime/Reference/reference.html

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@JustSide, How would I include them? i.e. -(void)detect { [self architecture]; }? – Joe Habadas Jul 7 '12 at 20:14
up vote 0 down vote accepted
- (void)checkArchitecture {

NSArray *bundleArch = [[NSBundle bundleWithPath:@"/path/to/other/bundle"] executableArchitectures];

}
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