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I wrote a code that simulates the use of abc module and properties. However, it seems that I couldn't be able to access width and height variables. The code is as the following:

from abc import ABCMeta, abstractmethod

class Polygon:

__metaclass__ = ABCMeta

@abstractmethod
def compute_area(self): pass


def __init__(self):
    self.width = None
    self.height = None

@property
def width_prop(self):
    return self.width

@property
def height_prop(self):
    return self.height

@width_setter.setter
def width_setter(self, width):
    self.width = width

@height_setter.setter
def height_setter(self, height):
    self.height = height



class Triangle(Polygon):
    def compute_area(self):
        return 0.5 * width * height




if __name__ == "__main__":
    tri = Triangle()
    tri.height_setter(20)
    tri.width_setter(30)
    print "Area of the triangle = ", tri.compute_area()

The error message that I obtained is NameError: name 'width_setter' is not defined. What could be wrong in my implementation?

EDIT:

from abc import ABCMeta, abstractmethod

class Polygon:

__metaclass__ = ABCMeta

@abstractmethod
def compute_area(self): pass


def __init__(self):
    self.width = None
    self.height = None

@property
def width_prop(self):
    return self.width

@width_prop.setter
def width_setter(self, width):
    self.width = width

@property
def height_prop(self):
    return self.height

@height_prop.setter
def height_setter(self, height):
    self.height = height



class Triangle(Polygon):
    def compute_area(self):
        return 0.5 * self.width * self.height




if __name__ == "__main__":
    tri = Triangle()
    tri.height_prop = 20
    tri.width_prop = 30
    print "Area of the triangle = ", tri.compute_area()
share|improve this question
    
You must mean @width_prop.setter and @height_prop.setter. –  stranac Jul 7 '12 at 21:11
    
Yes, I've done it. But still complaining.. –  alfa_80 Jul 7 '12 at 21:22
    
Your setter functions need to be named the same as the properties. Also, please edit the question with the updated code. –  stranac Jul 7 '12 at 21:28
3  
@Shah: don't burden your Python with all this noise. Omit all the getters and setters, just access the attributes directly. If you think you shouldn't, you need to learn more about Python. –  Ned Batchelder Jul 7 '12 at 22:16
1  
If your getters and setters are only what you show here, then you are wasting your time. You could simply access the attributes directly and get exactly the same effect. The question you linked to was about whether to write get_my_attr vs @property def my_attr. If you need to have code in one or the other, then sure, use a property. But if you have no code, and are merely forwarding on a privately-named attribute, then skip the whole thing and just use the attribute. –  Ned Batchelder Jul 7 '12 at 22:50

3 Answers 3

up vote -5 down vote accepted

edit: In such simple case like example use direct variable access. See Ned Batchelder's answer.

If you need extra functionality when accessing variables you can use this.


http://docs.python.org/library/functions.html#property

from abc import ABCMeta, abstractmethod

class Polygon(object):

    __metaclass__ = ABCMeta

    @abstractmethod
    def compute_area(self): 
        pass


    def __init__(self):
        self._width = None
        self._height = None

    @property
    def width(self):
        getting_variable_value()
        return self._width

    @width.setter
    def width(self, width):
        setting_variable_value()
        self._width = width

    @property
    def height(self):
        getting_variable_value()
        return self._height

    @height.setter
    def height(self, height):
        setting_variable_value()
        self._height = height



class Triangle(Polygon):
    def compute_area(self):
        return 0.5 * self.width * self.height


if __name__ == "__main__":
    tri = Triangle()
    tri.height = 20
    tri.width = 30
    print "Area of the triangle = ", tri.compute_area()
share|improve this answer
8  
This is horrible. Why write getters and setters like this? Python isn't Java, and doesn't need all this noise. –  Ned Batchelder Jul 7 '12 at 22:15
    
-1 Agreed with Ned "It works" is a minimum requirement not the only requirement. –  Voo Jul 7 '12 at 22:37
    
Voo: Works in meaning "Gives no error". My bad. –  reacher Jul 8 '12 at 6:44

Write Python as Python, not as C++ or Java:

class Polygon:
    def compute_area(self):             # if you need this at all...
        raise NotImplementedError()     # what does it do for you?

    def __init__(self):
        self.width = None
        self.height = None

class Triangle(Polygon):
    def compute_area(self):
        return 0.5 * self.width * self.height

if __name__ == "__main__":
    tri = Triangle()
    tri.height = 20
    tri.width = 30
    print "Area of the triangle = ", tri.compute_area()
share|improve this answer
    
The reason he has a compute_area in his baseclass is because that way he can guarantee that all subclasses provide an implementation of it at definition time. –  Voo Jul 8 '12 at 0:06
    
@Voo: except the base class doesn't have a useful definition, so what has he gained? –  Ned Batchelder Jul 8 '12 at 0:11
2  
That people who provide subclasses get the error at definition time and not only when someone sometime later calls compute_area (yes python is dynamic and all, but I personally always like getting errors sooner than later). Also it's a nice way to document in the code itself what methods a subclass has to provide instead of only in comment form. –  Voo Jul 8 '12 at 0:14
    
@Voo: ok, we'll keep the base implementation of compute_area. –  Ned Batchelder Jul 8 '12 at 0:18
3  
@voo your point about documentation is valid but you are wrong about when you get the error. If a subclass doesn't implement the method, you'll only get an error when the method is used. The only difference is whether it's an AttributeError or NotImplementedError. –  Tony Meyer Jul 8 '12 at 1:51

"fixed" (but totally unpythonic) code:

class Polygon(object):
    __metaclass__ = ABCMeta

    @abstractmethod
    def compute_area(self): 
        pass

    def __init__(self):
        self.width = None
        self.height = None

    @property
    def width_prop(self):
        return self.width

    @width_prop.setter
    def width_prop(self, width):
        self.width = width

    @property
    def height_prop(self):
        return self.height

   @height_prop.setter
   def height_prop(self, height):
    self.height = height


class Triangle(Polygon):
    def compute_area(self):
        return 0.5 * self.width_prop * self.height_prop

if __name__ == "__main__":
    tri = Triangle()
    tri.height_prop = 20
    tri.width_prop = 30
    print "Area of the triangle = ", tri.compute_area()

Now for the serious part: Python is not Java. You don't need getters/setters for plain attributes access, since Python as a pretty good support for computed attributes (the property type you failed to use correctly being a very simplistic generic - but very handy - implementation of). Your getters and setters are not doing anything useful, and you'll have the very same result (with less code and better perfs) accessing the attributes directly:

class Polygon(whatever):
    __metaclass__ = ABCMeta

    def __init__(self, witdh=None, height=None):
        self.width = width
        self.height = height


    @abstractmethod
    def compute_area(self): 
        pass


class Triangle(Polygon):
    def compute_area(self):
        return 0.5 * self.width * self.height


if __name__ == "__main__":
    tri = Triangle(20, 30)
    print "Area of the triangle = ", tri.compute_area()

For the record, Python doesn't have "private" / "public" keywords - only a convention that names starting with a leading underscore are "implementation stuff" and shouldn't be accessed by client code. Note that the "shouldn't" only means what it means : nothing prevents you from accessing them, but then don't complain if anything breaks, now or in next release. Kind of "warranty void if unsealed".

wrt/ proper use or property: I won't go into details (would require an in-depth Python execution model and object model explanation), but the correct syntax is:

class MyClass(object):

    def __init__(self, prop):
        # this will invoke prop.setter
        self.prop = prop

    # defines a property named "prop"
    # will be accessed just like a plain
    # attribute but will go thru the getter and setter

    @property
    def prop(self):
        # this is the getter
        return self._some_val * 42

    # now add a setter to 'prop':
    @prop.setter
    def prop(self, val):
        self._some_val = val / 42


obj = MyClass(10)
print obj.prop
obj.prop = 5
print obj.prop

Also (and finally): Python has no "implicit this" (or "implicit self"). You must use self.attr within a method to access any attribute.

share|improve this answer
    
I actually want to maintain the use abc as my above code. I still get this error: TypeError: 'NoneType' object is not callable –  alfa_80 Jul 7 '12 at 21:04
    
Please read the edit. wrt/ your error: it comes with a full traceback, please read it, you should be able to fix the code by yourself (else start with the official Python tutorial - which you should obviously do anyway) –  bruno desthuilliers Jul 7 '12 at 21:09
    
I don't think your "correct syntax" can work; using whatever instead of prop should generate an AttributeError. –  DSM Jul 7 '12 at 21:13
    
I've tried also the edited version of yours, but it still complaints "tri.height_prop = 20 AttributeError: can't set attribute" –  alfa_80 Jul 7 '12 at 21:19
    
@DSM: you're right, thanks (snippet fixed) –  bruno desthuilliers Jul 7 '12 at 21:30

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