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import java.io.File;
import java.io.IOException;
import java.util.ArrayList;
import java.util.Scanner;
import javax.swing.JOptionPane;

public class Test {
    private static ArrayList<Countries> arr = new ArrayList<Countries>();
    private static ArrayList<Countries> d = new ArrayList<Countries>();
    static String country;
    static String capital;
    static String cities;
    static String cevap;
    static int score =0;


    public static void main(String args[]) throws IOException{
        Scanner keybord = new Scanner(System.in);
        arr = new ArrayList<Countries>();
        d = read("data.txt");

         for(int i = 0; i < d.size(); i++){
             System.out.print( d.get(i).toString());
             cevap = keybord.nextLine();
             if(cevap.equalsIgnoreCase(d.get(i).getCapital())){
                 System.out.println ("The answer is true!\nYou win 10 points");
             score += 10;
             }
             else{
                 System.out.println("The answer is not true" + " The answer is " + d.get(i).getCapital() + "\nYou loose 10 points");
                 score -= 10;
             }
             System.out.println("You're score is: " + score);
             System.out.println();
         }
    }



    public static ArrayList<Countries> read(String filename) throws IOException{
        Scanner scan = new Scanner(new File(filename));
        while(scan.hasNext()){
            country = scan.nextLine(); //System.out.println(country);
            String cities1 = scan.nextLine(); //System.out.println(cities1);
            String cities2 = scan.nextLine(); //System.out.println(cities2);
            String cities3 = scan.nextLine(); //System.out.println(cities3);
            String cities4 = scan.nextLine(); //System.out.println(cities4);
            String capital = scan.nextLine(); //System.out.println(capital);
            Countries c = new Countries(country, cities1, cities2, cities3, cities4, capital); 
            arr.add(c);
            scan.nextLine();
        }
        return arr;
    }



}

To make the Gui of this program should I change the main part as it is below. Because I think it will be more convenient for me to read and initialize the variables from the data where I read from. Or should I create another class for the Gui?

public static void main(String args[]) throws IOException{
        Scanner keybord = new Scanner(System.in);
        arr = new ArrayList<Countries>();
        d = read("data.txt");

         for(int i = 0; i < d.size(); i++){
             lcountry = new JLabel(d.get(i).getCity1());
             label1 = new JLabel(d.get(i).getCity1());
             label2 = new JLabel(d.get(i).getCity2());
             label3 = new JLabel(d.get(i).getCity3());
             label4 = new JLabel(d.get(i).getCity4());
share|improve this question
    
You would have to toss that code out and start afresh with non-static OOPs code if you wanted to make a GUI of this. –  Hovercraft Full Of Eels Jul 7 '12 at 21:33

1 Answer 1

No, I would recommend encapsulating all the UI stuff in a separate class. It's far less usable if you put it in a main method.

As a matter of fact, this goes for all your classes. A main method should be very small and do little more than create instances of your classes that do the real work. If the main is big, you're doing it wrong.

Your problem should be usable whether you go with a text or a graphical UI. You can tell you've encapsulated things well when you can swap a text UI for a graphical one and everything still works. It's called encapsulation and layering. If you can't swap the UI easily you're doing it wrong.

share|improve this answer
    
Ok I will the GUI part in a another class but what I could not understand is that how can I access the data which I read in the Tester class and display them in the UI? –  Zeyneb Jul 7 '12 at 21:44
    
@ZuZuZzZz: You give the Tester class accessor and mutator (getter and setter) methods. –  Hovercraft Full Of Eels Jul 7 '12 at 21:47

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