Dismiss
Announcing Stack Overflow Documentation

We started with Q&A. Technical documentation is next, and we need your help.

Whether you're a beginner or an experienced developer, you can contribute.

Sign up and start helping → Learn more about Documentation →

Very specific C++ compilation syntax error that I can't figure out a solution to: I'm fairly new to C++ and read up on functions being passed as parameters. The compile error doesn't make sense to me because I've read the code over-and-over. Please help.

Edit: I removed the waitpid(pid_t,int,int) and stuck with just system() commands. Thanks for the help everyone.

#include <stdlib.h>
#include <sys/types.h>
#include <unistd.h>
#include <sys/wait.h>

int main(){
/* puts apt-get purge text into ~$ purge_e_output */
    system("sudo apt-get purge enlightenment > purge_e_output.txt");
    system("echo **Pid of apt-get**");
    system("pidof apt-get");
    try{
        pid_t waitpid(pid_t getpid("apt-get"), int *statusPtr, int WUNTRACED);
    } catch(...){}
    system("echo **REMOVING ENGLIGHTENMENT**"); 
    system("sudo apt-get purge enlightenment");
    system("pidof apt-get");
    try{
        pid_t waitpid(pid_t getpid("apt-get"), int *statusPtr, int WUNTRACED);
    } catch(...){}

/* puts apt-get autoremove text into ~$ autoremove_e_output */
    system("sudo apt-get autoremove > autoremove_e_output.txt");
    system("echo **Pid of apt-get**");
    system("pidof apt-get");
    try{
        pid_t waitpid(pid_t getpid("apt-get"), int *statusPtr, int WUNTRACED);
    } catch(...){}

    system("echo **REMOVING E DATA**"); 
    system("sudo apt-get autoremove");
    system("echo **Pid of apt-get**");
    system("pidof apt-get");
    try{
        pid_t waitpid(pid_t getpid("apt-get"), int *statusPtr, int WUNTRACED);
    } catch(...){}

/* puts apt-get autoclean text into ~$ autoclean_e_output */
    system("sudo apt-get autoclean > autoclean_e_output.txt");
    system("echo **Pid of apt-get**");
    system("pidof apt-get");
    try{
        pid_t waitpid(pid_t getpid("apt-get"), int *statusPtr, int WUNTRACED);
    } catch(...){}
    system("echo **CLEANING**");    
    system("sudo apt-get autoclean");
    system("echo **Pid of apt-get**");
    system("pidof apt-get");
    try{
        pid_t waitpid(pid_t getpid("apt-get"), int *statusPtr, int WUNTRACED);
    } catch(...){}

/* reinstall englightenment */
    system("echo **REINSTALLING**");    
    system("sudo apt-get install enlightenment");
    system("echo **Pid of apt-get**");
    system("pidof apt-get");
    try{
        pid_t waitpid(pid_t getpid("apt-get"), int *statusPtr, int WUNTRACED);
    } catch(...){}

/* logs */
    system("echo && echo Logs for wtf just happened:");
    system("echo && echo ~$ purge_e_output.txt && echo ~$ autoremove_e_output.txt && echo ~$ autoclean_e_output.txt");

}

Compile error:

~$ g++ JIC.cpp -o JIC

JIC.cpp: In function ‘int main()’:
JIC.cpp:12: error: expected ‘,’ or ‘...’ before ‘(’ token
JIC.cpp:18: error: expected ‘,’ or ‘...’ before ‘(’ token
JIC.cpp:26: error: expected ‘,’ or ‘...’ before ‘(’ token
JIC.cpp:34: error: expected ‘,’ or ‘...’ before ‘(’ token
JIC.cpp:42: error: expected ‘,’ or ‘...’ before ‘(’ token
JIC.cpp:49: error: expected ‘,’ or ‘...’ before ‘(’ token
JIC.cpp:58: error: expected ‘,’ or ‘...’ before ‘(’ token
share|improve this question

closed as too localized by SoapBox, jogojapan, rlemon, Filip Roséen - refp, Michael Myers Jul 8 '12 at 3:16

This question is unlikely to help any future visitors; it is only relevant to a small geographic area, a specific moment in time, or an extraordinarily narrow situation that is not generally applicable to the worldwide audience of the internet. For help making this question more broadly applicable, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
Are you trying to make or call the function? You can't make them inside other functions, and that isn't the proper way to call one. – chris Jul 8 '12 at 0:03
    
when you call a function, don't specify the type of the argument. .. and 1) why do you call waitpid? 2) a shell script would be better for this task. – Karoly Horvath Jul 8 '12 at 0:05
    
In addition to all that, you don't waitpid() for stuff called via system(). And I've never seen a getpid() call that takes a process name... and I think it's unlikely that waitpid() or getpid() will actually throw c++ exceptions :-) – Christian Stieber Jul 8 '12 at 0:08
    
This: pid_t waitpid(pid_t getpid("apt-get"), int *statusPtr, int WUNTRACED); is a syntax error. It would be helpful if you could tell us what it's supposed to do. – Keith Thompson Jul 8 '12 at 0:09
    
The system() call spawns and waits for a process to finish so you will never be able to find the process ID (the process will be gone by the time that line is reached). If you really need to do this, please update your question. – Kevin Grant Jul 8 '12 at 0:11

This doesn't make sense in that place:

pid_t waitpid(pid_t getpid("apt-get"), int *statusPtr, int WUNTRACED);
share|improve this answer

You cannot do this

    pid_t waitpid(pid_t getpid("apt-get"), int *statusPtr, int WUNTRACED);

instead you need to actually create instances of the variables that you want to pass to this function. For example

    pid_t pid = getpid();
    int status = // set to some value that you choose

then you can call your function like this

    pid_t pid2 = waitpid(pid, &status, WUNTRACED);

now pid2 is the value returned by the waitpid function. I would strongly advise you to do a little more reading - whether it be books or tutorials - as your question shows you don't yet have a strong grasp of the language. I mean absolutely no offence by that at all - just trying to help.

share|improve this answer
    
No offence taken, but yeah I removed waitpid, etc., and the application will just use system() commands. – Shav Bhattacharyya Jul 8 '12 at 0:21

The line

pid_t waitpid(pid_t getpid("apt-get"), int *statusPtr, int WUNTRACED);

looks like a function declaration, both to me and to the C++ compiler. It looks like you're trying to declare a function named waitpid whose return type is pid_t, which takes three parameters, a pid_t, an int*, and an int. However, the name of a parameter can't be getpid("apt-get"), so besides this being the wrong place in the file for a function declaration, you can't interpret this as a function declaration because it tries to use a function call as the name of a parameter.

Conversely, if you try to interpret this line as a function call to a function named waitpid (that's already defined), getpid("apt-get") makes sense as a parameter because it means you want to pass the result of the getpid function as the first parameter to the waitpid function. However, the rest of that line is incorrect syntax for a function call, because the types of the parameters to a function call should not be specified inline - you should be passing it parameters that have already been defined as variables or functions. A syntactically-correct call to the waitpid function might look like this:

int* statusPtr = ...;
int WUNTRACED = ...;
pid_t myPid = waitpid(getpid("apt-get"), &statusPtr, WUNTRACED);

And the following definition might appear elsewhere:

pid_t waitpid(pid_t pid, int *statusPtr, int WUNTRACED) {
    ...
}
share|improve this answer
    
It looks more like a function declaration (a definition includes the body of the function, { ... }). But the pid_t getpid("apt-get") isn't a valid parameter declaration, so the whole thing is just a syntax error. – Keith Thompson Jul 8 '12 at 0:22

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.