Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

curious... how would you write this Ruby in JS?

Array.new(3, Array.new(3, 0))

which returns

[[0, 0, 0], [0, 0, 0], [0, 0, 0]]

i've tried a variety of things but they all seem messy. i suppose some things just can't be as clean as Ruby, but how would you approach this?

maybe i'll learn a JS trick or two ;)

EDIT It was revealed that this Ruby code does not actually create 3 arrays. It creates 1 array, that the others reference. This was not the intention. I am looking for a way to easily map a 2 dimensional array with X amount of elements, and Y amount of nested elements in JS.

Also... This is a contrived example. the intension is to be able to substitute 3 with any number. this was just an example using 3.

share|improve this question

6 Answers 6

You can define it like so:

var arr = [[0, 0, 0], [0, 0, 0], [0, 0, 0]];

Essentially you're explicitly defining it. However, this array contains references to three different arrays (making a total of 4). To make it behave like ruby, you would need to create a function that mimics this behavior:

function arr(size, element) {
   var ret = [];

   for(var i = 0; i < size; i++) {
       ret.push(element);
   }

   return ret;      
}

Then you could do:

var myArray = arr(3, arr(3, 0)); //myArray contains [[0, 0, 0], [0, 0, 0], [0, 0, 0]]

This is more true to the behavior you see in ruby since each element in the array is a reference to the same array (making a total of just two arrays). You can verify this by doing myArray[0][1] = 2; and then inspecting myArray. You should see the second element in each of the arrays in myArray set to 2.

share|improve this answer

If you just want an empty array container, just to keep track of the length, or to assign values later on, you can do this, a bit hacky but should work:

var a = [[,,],[,,],[,,]]

a[1][1] = 'foo'
alert(a[1][1]) //foo
share|improve this answer

The following is valid Javascript syntax, assuming you want to create 4 arrays:

[[0, 0, 0], [0, 0, 0], [0, 0, 0]]

EDIT:

Actually your ruby code only creates TWO arrays. One array is [0,0,0] and the other array contains three references to that array. If you change array[0][2] you also change array[1][2]. Are you sure this is what you want? The equivalent javascript code would be:

var b = [0, 0, 0];
var a = [b, b, b];
share|improve this answer
    
Was about to post this. if compressed [[0,0,0],[0,0,0],[0,0,0]] is around same amount of characters than the ruby version. –  elclanrs Jul 8 '12 at 2:29
2  
Oh i like your edit +1, but you'll have to to set b = "[0, 0, 0]"; –  John Riselvato Jul 8 '12 at 2:33
    
John, I'm not sure why you want b to be a string. The OP said nothing about strings. I did just add semicolons though. –  David Grayson Jul 8 '12 at 2:38
    
ah! i did not realize that catch. that was not my intention. –  brewster Jul 8 '12 at 2:40
    
@DavidGrayson, the brackets won't show up then. –  John Riselvato Jul 8 '12 at 2:53

In Ruby you can get the desired effect like this

a = Array.new(3) { Array.new(3, 0) }
p a #[[0, 0, 0], [0, 0, 0], [0, 0, 0]]
a[0][0] = 1
p a #[[1, 0, 0], [0, 0, 0], [0, 0, 0]]

In JS like this

var multi_dim = function(a, b, value) {
  var myObj = [];
  for (i=0;i<a;i++) {
    myObj[i] = [];
    for (j=0;j<b;j++) {
      myObj[i][j] = value;
    }
  }
  return myObj;
};

var c = multi_dim(3,3,0);
WScript.echo(c); //0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0
c[0][0]=1
WScript.echo(c); //1,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0

replace WScript.echo with document.write if not in windows and/or in a browser

share|improve this answer

I guess you could just do this: http://jsfiddle.net/PZBUr/

var i = "[0, 0, 0]";
var myArray = new Array(i, new Array(i, new Array(i)));
document.write(myArray);
​
share|improve this answer
    
But that creates nested arrays the first element of each being a string. –  nnnnnn Jul 8 '12 at 2:39
    
Agree, you'd have to use evil() or mostly find another solution –  elclanrs Jul 8 '12 at 2:41

Another way of doing it is:

var arr = new Array(
    new Array(0, 0, 0),
    new Array(0, 0, 0),
    new Array(0, 0, 0)
);

or simply

var arr = [
    [0, 0, 0],
    [0, 0, 0],
    [0, 0, 0]
]
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.