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I realize this is a very specific question so it would be helpful if the answer people give includes explicit codes on how to do this. Thanks.

I have an abstract base class Shape:

class Shape
{
    .....
    virtual bool GetIntersection(Shape* _shape) = 0;
}

class Circle : public Shape  {...}
class Triangle : public Shape {...}

Both these derived classes overrides GetIntersection;

I have:

//main.cpp
....
Shape* shape;
Shape* circle = new Circle;

if(input == 0) shape = new Circle;
else shape = new Triangle;

circle->GetIntersection(shape);

which gives an error.

I read something about visitor patterns and think that this might be the way to solve my problem as I basically need to determine which derived class the parameter to GetIntersection is using. Can someone explain how I would implement a visitor pattern for this case? Or if there is another simpler solution to this problem.

Any help would be appreciated.

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what error do you encounter? –  Arne Jul 8 '12 at 8:37
    
Sorry, I do not mean I get an error, just that I get a problem here. I have no way of knowing if the shape in question is a Circle or a Triangle and I have different methods to test intersection for both. –  l3utterfly Jul 9 '12 at 9:13
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4 Answers

up vote 0 down vote accepted

I'm right now facing the same problem with collisions between different shapes.

I think we cannot use the Visitor pattern "as is", because it requires that the classes of a hierarchy A (visitors) visit the classes of another hierarchy B (visited elements), where the classes of B only know about the abstraction of A (IVisitor, for example) while the classes of B know about the subclasses of A (VisitedElement1, VisitedElement2... subclasses of VisitedElement).

In our case, we are trying to visit Shapes with Shapes while keeping our Shape class decoupled from the subclasses, so the Visitor pattern doesn't apply.

The best solution I can think of is that the Shape class, directly or through another interface, declares "GetSpecificIntersection" methods for all the subtypes:

class Shape
{
    .....
public:
    virtual bool GetIntersection(Shape* _shape) = 0;    
protected:
    virtual bool GetSpecificIntersection(Circle* _circle) = 0;
    virtual bool GetSpecificIntersection(Triangle* _triangle) = 0;
}

class Circle
{
    .....
public:
    virtual bool GetIntersection(Shape* _shape);
    {
        return _shape->GetSpecificIntersection(this);
    }
protected:
    virtual bool GetSpecificIntersection(Circle* _circle) { ... }
    virtual bool GetSpecificIntersection(Triangle* _triangle) { ... }
}

class Triangle { /* analog to Circle */ }

Therefore, you must implement those specific intersection methods for each kind of shape to any other kind of shape and the Shape class is coupled to all the possible shapes. If I'm not wrong, this violates OCP but preserves LSP.

Another option I've just come up with is to "favor composition over inheritance" and make something like this:

class Shape
{
    .....
public:
    virtual bool GetIntersection(Shape* _shape)
    {
        return _shape->figure->GetIntersection(this->figure);
    }

private:
    Figure* figure;
}

class Figure
{
    .....
public:
    virtual bool GetIntersection(Figure* _figure) = 0;
protected:
    virtual bool GetSpecificIntersection(Circle* _circle) = 0;
    virtual bool GetSpecificIntersection(Triangle* _triangle) = 0;
}

class Circle
{
    .....
public:
    virtual bool GetIntersection(Figure* _figure)
    {
        return _figure->GetSpecificIntersection(this);
    }
protected:
    virtual bool GetSpecificIntersection(Circle* _circle) { ... }
    virtual bool GetSpecificIntersection(Triangle* _triangle) { ... }
}

class Triangle { /* analog to Circle */ }

It's the same as before, but by doing this you decouple your Shape class (which is the interface used by the classes of your game) from the different "Figures" (I didn't come up with a better name), so adding new Figures shouldn't even lead to recompile your client classes. This violates OCP only in the "Figures" hierarchy, and preserves LSP for both "Shape" and "Figure".

If someone can suggest a better way to do this while avoiding downcasting, I'll be very thankful :D

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Thanks a lot for your answer. I've did some reading after writing my question and figured out that using visitor patterns is pretty much not a viable option here. So I've decided to adopt your first method (which, by the way, seems a bit less complicated than your second). Thanks for all the time you took to write such a long answer, it is very appreciated. –  l3utterfly Sep 20 '12 at 3:19
    
In case anyone is interested, I've forgone my original plan of having so many specific shapes that bounds objects in my game engine and have reverted instead just to use an axis-aligned bounding-box for everything. It requires far less effort to determine intersection and it is actually much faster to do a very quick (but broad) intersection test between AABBs and pass the result right into the narrow phase. I hope this helps for those of you who are trying to collision detect: don't bother with specific bounding boxes. –  l3utterfly Sep 20 '12 at 3:23
    
You're welcome! I'm glad it's useful for you :) (May I ask for a +1 in my answer, please? haha) Why do you think it's more complicated the second one? Of course it adds a new step in the process, but doing that you decouple your client classes from the different shapes. If you add a new shape, with the second method you won't need to recompile the classes that use Shapes. –  sergiou87 Sep 20 '12 at 10:29
    
Well, I don't know... I guess this is just a programming habit sort of thing. I prefer to use inheritance. And it is one less class to write! :) (By the way, I don't think I can give you a +1 because I don't have enough reputation... it says you need 15 to do it. Sorry. But I've marked it as an accepted answer.) –  l3utterfly Sep 21 '12 at 2:56
    
No problem, thanks anyway :D –  sergiou87 Sep 21 '12 at 18:53
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This question seems to overlap with this one: Design pattern for checking collision between shapes

in which the visitor pattern is used, and seems quite clear. The trick is to make each shape (circle, square, whatever) be the visitor for each other shape.

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your solution is right.

You could at first get a bounding box and check collision between bounding boxes. Keep in mind that in any case, you can't compare apples to oranges. So start comparing both bounding boxes.

Then if there is a collision, you might want to look for individual points. Each shape can return points or vector of its contour and you can easily find out if there is a collision or not. There might be some ways to speed up things like knowing if a point is inside a square is easy or knowing if a point is inside a circle is just checking the length from a point to center is bigger than the radius.

You can then do something like Shape { bool isPointInside(Point p) = 0; }

Which will be much faster than checking for each individual points.

You can also override getIntersection for circle to check differently for squares etc. Instead of just Shape.

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However, the problem is I have no way of knowing if the shape is a Circle or Triangle in advance. It has to be of the general form Shape*. If I change the function prototype GetIntersection(Shape* _shape) to GetIntersection(Circle* _circle) or GetIntersection(Triangle* _triangle), I get the error that there is no suitable conversion from Shape* to Circle* or Triangle*. –  l3utterfly Jul 9 '12 at 9:16
    
you can always return a set of points to form vector and check if points are inside or outside the shape formed by points –  Loïc Faure-Lacroix Jul 9 '12 at 9:27
    
but you should test with bounding box, and possibly bounding circle too. and then check for points. For example, a square return 4 points, a circle may return lots of point depending on the precision. let say 16 points is good enough. with 2 points you form a vector and if you create all vector clockwize or counterclockwize all the normal will point either inside or outside the shape and you can do some vector operation to test if point is infront or behind a plane. you can create a x,y,z point using x,y,1 since the z isn't really important. Its just there to do some geometric operations –  Loïc Faure-Lacroix Jul 9 '12 at 9:30
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You may use f.x. dynamic_cast<Circle *>(shape) to see if a shape is a Circle. It returns null if shape is not a Circle, a valid pointer to a Circle instance otherwise.

Us this if one of your GetInserection methods knows how to intersect with a specific other Shape sub-type.

Apart from that, follow the guideline from Loïc Faure-Lacroix's answer.

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