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I have a date in string as in $str1="20120704". I want to subtract 1 day from that date, and store the value of date as a string in $str2. How can i do it?

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5 Answers 5

up vote 6 down vote accepted

This is very similar to another question you asked a couple of days ago. So, unsurprisingly, the solution is also very similar.

Time::Piece and Time::Seconds have been part of the standard Perl distribution since version 5.10.0. You should use them.

#!/usr/bin/perl

use strict;
use warnings;
use 5.010;

use Time::Piece;
use Time::Seconds;

my $format = '%Y%m%d';
my $str1 = '20120704';

my $dt1 = Time::Piece->strptime($str1, $format);
my $dt2 = $dt1 - ONE_DAY;
my $str2 = $dt2->strftime($format);
say $str2;
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+1 for using standard Perl modules. –  David W. Jul 8 '12 at 17:43
    
Using perl 5.8. Will try to download the time piece module and try it out. Thanks a lot. –  Arav Jul 8 '12 at 23:53
2  
PErl 5.8.0 is ten years old. Time to update! –  Dave Cross Jul 9 '12 at 5:19
    
Thanks a lot. It's working. Final output date i am stored in the below way. $outDate=sprintf("%04d%02d%02d", $year2, $month2, $day2); Hope it's correct. –  Arav Jul 10 '12 at 0:19
    
You seem to be using variables that don't come from my example. So it's hard to know if your code is correct. In general using a strftime method would be preferred over manually building a string using sprintf. –  Dave Cross Jul 10 '12 at 13:28

I advise you use module DateTime and one ext for format. Also you can see modules Date::Calc or Date::Parse + POSIX function strftime.

use strict;
use DateTime;
use DateTime::Format::Strptime;

my $date_str = '20120704';
my $date_obj = DateTime::Format::Strptime->parse_datetime($date_str);

my $date_res = $date_obj->subtract(days => 1)->ymd;
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This one's a lot cleaner than mine. +1 to you, sir, for expressing intent of numbers etc. TIL ->subtract; thank you. –  Bernd Jendrissek Jul 8 '12 at 12:04
    
Thanks a lot for the info –  Arav Jul 9 '12 at 0:01

Perl stores dates and times in an internal format that can easily be manipulated. What you have is a date in YYYYMMDD format. So, what you need to do is:

  1. Convert your date (which is in YYYYMMDD format) into Perl's date/time storage format.
  2. Use Perl to manipulate this date and time.
  3. When you want to output the results, you have to convert it back into the format you want.

Convert your date (which is in YYYYMMDD format) into Perl's date/time storage format.

The best module for doing this is Time::Piece which comes with Perl. It's pretty simple:

my $date = Time::Piece->strptime($str1, '%Y%m%d');

$date will now be your date and time, but stored in a format Perl can understand and manipulate. The %Y%m%d is a description of your format, so Perl knows where to find the year, month, and day of the month. You can look at strftime to see the various format parameters. In your case:

  • %Y - represents the year with the century, such as 2012.
  • %m - Represents the month as a two digit number such as 03 or 12.
  • %d - Represents the date of the month as a two digit number from 01 to 31 if there are that many days in the month.

Next: Manipulate your date.

You can use another module called Time::Seconds that will take care of this for you.

Time::Seconds defines a bunch of constants like ONE_DAY which makes thing easier:

 my $date = $date - ONE_DAY;

Finally: Convert the date back to the format you want.

Again, Time::Piece has a nifty, easy way to do this for you:

$date->ymd("");

This converts $date into a string in the Year-month-day format. By default, this will put a - between each part. However, you can pass it the character you want to use as the divider. In this case, nothing.

All together:

use Time::Piece   # For manipulating and storing the date
use Time::Seconds # For the nice constants such as ONE_DAY and ONE_WEEK

my $date = Time::Piece->strptime($str1, '%Y%m%d');
my $date = $date - ONE_DAY;
my $str2 = $date->ymd('');

That's pretty simple.


Dave Cross gave you an excellent answer. I'd normally just up vote him, and leave it at that. However, he also mentioned you asked a similar question a few days ago. To me, it means that you might have used Dave Cross' previous answer, but you didn't understand it. That's not good.

Look at the documentation of Time::Piece and Time::Seconds. Take a look at strfdate and play around with that. Learn it and understand it. If you have any questions about these, ask them on Stackoverflow. People on Stackoverflow are happier answering questions like "How does this work?" rather than "Can you do this for me?". They'll take the time and effort to explain the first while most will either ignore the latter or give you a cursory answer.

This will make you a better programmer which means you're more valuable with your company and that translate into higher pay. It is worth your time and effort.

Try to understand it. Play around with it.


Addendum

Was using a older perl version 5.8 and thought of using the existing modules in the system. Also not sure of how time::piece works

That's a pretty old version of Perl, but it's common on Solaris.

In this case, we'll do it the very old fashion way.

There are two Perl function called localtime and gmtime. These take the number of seconds since January 1, 1970 and convert it into an array of values with each value representing a particular part of the time (month, year, day, hours, minutes, etc.).

What you need are inverse functions -- something that can take an array of values and convert it into the number of seconds since 1970. Since Perl 3.0, there has been such a module that's included in each version of Perl. In Perl 5.x, tt's called Time::Local. It gives you two functions called timelocal and timegm. These are the inverse functions we need.

First, we need to split up your string into separate year, month, and day, put that into an array for either timegm or timelocal to turn into the number of seconds since January 1, 1970.

Next, we'll subtract the number of seconds in a day. This is 60 * 60 * 24 or 86,400.

Finally, we'll convert that new date into an array that you can use to display the date in YYYYMMDD order.

Two important caveats!

  • The function assumes that the month is from 0 to 11 and not 1 to 12. This allows you to create an array to convert from month number to name. This means we have to subtract 1 from the month before we give it to gmtime and add one when take it back from timegm.
  • The year is the number of years since 1900. That means we have to subtract 1900 before we give it to gmtime, and add 1900 when we take it back from timegm.

And, now the program:

#! /usr/bin/env perl

use strict;
use warnings;

use Time::Local;

my $date = 20120615;    #2012-June-15

$date =~ /(....)(..)(..)/;  #Parse the date

my $year = $1;
my $month = $2;
my $day = $3;

$month -= 1;    #Month is 0 to 11 and not 1 to 12
$year -= 1900;  #Year is number of years since 1900

my $seconds = 0;
my $minutes = 0;
my $hours = 0;

my $perl_date = timegm($seconds, $minutes, $hours, $day, $month, $year);

my $perl_date2 = $perl_date - (60 * 60 *24);

my ($seconds2, $minutes2, $hours2, $day2, $month2, $year2)  = gmtime($perl_date2);

$month2 += 1;   #Month is returned as 0 - 11. Make 1 - 12
$year2 += 1900; #Year is given as years since 1900. Add 1900 back to it. 

printf qq(The date is %04d-%02d-%02d \n), $year2, $month2, $day2;
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sinan. Thanks a lot for your time and the detailed explanation. Was using a older perl version 5.8 and thought of using the existing modules in the system. Also not sure of how time::piece works. Will try to download the time piece module and try it out. Thanks a lot. –  Arav Jul 8 '12 at 23:58
    
@Arav - There are built in Perl functions that can handle this in a rather primitive way, and they exist in Perl 5.8. See the Addendum in my answer. –  David W. Jul 9 '12 at 1:07
    
Thanks a lot. It's working. Final output date i am stored in the below way. $outDate=sprintf("%04d%02d%02d", $year2, $month2, $day2); Hope it's correct. –  Arav Jul 10 '12 at 0:18
    
@Arav I added the dashes in the printf, so it's easier to see what's going on and how the specifications for each part of the date are done. See sprintf on how the various % format codes. –  David W. Jul 10 '12 at 3:16

Will this do?

use Date::Parse;
use POSIX;

my $s1 = "20120704";
my $t = str2time($s1) - 86400;
my $s2 = strftime "%Y%m%d", localtime $t;

print "$s2\n";

Watch out for localtime vs gmtime, and leap seconds if you care about those.

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Thanks a lot for the info –  Arav Jul 9 '12 at 0:01

This is a simple strptime/strftime roundtrip. Since strftime normalises inputs it is simply to just subtract 1 from the mday field.

use POSIX 'strftime';
use POSIX::strptime 'strptime';

my $fmt = "%Y%m%d";
my @t = strptime "20120704", $fmt;
$t[3] -= 1;  # 1 day
my $str2 = strftime $fmt, @t;
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Thanks a lot for the info –  Arav Jul 9 '12 at 0:02

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