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I try to return a string value when i print an instance of my class. It seems like that shouldn't work like i wish.

class oObject (object):
    def __init__(self, value):
        self.value = value
    def __str__(self):
        return str(self.value)
    def __repr__(self):
        return str(self.value)

new = oObject(50)
# if I use print it's Okay
print new
# But if i try to do something like that ...
print new + '.kine'
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What goes wrong? –  Martijn Pieters Jul 8 '12 at 13:52
1  
Use print str(new)+'.kine', Python doesn't coerce objects to string when concatenating them. –  millimoose Jul 8 '12 at 13:54

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

override __add__ for it:

class oObject (object):
    def __init__(self, value):
        self.value = value
    def __str__(self):
        return str(self.value)
    def __repr__(self):
        return str(self.value)
    def __add__(self,val):
        return str(self.value)+val

new = oObject(50)
'''if I use print it's Okay'''
print new
'''But if i try to do something like that ...'''
print new + '.kine'   #prints 50.kine
share|improve this answer
1  
Rather a lot of overkill, don't you think? Python doesn't coerce automatically for other objects, better use an explicit str() call on the instance. –  Martijn Pieters Jul 8 '12 at 13:55
    
@MartijnPieters yes it is, but if he wants to convert this to string implicitly then it's good. –  Ashwini Chaudhary Jul 8 '12 at 13:58
4  
Explicit is better than implicit. –  Martijn Pieters Jul 8 '12 at 13:59
    
That's fine ! I work with an API who returns a lot of strings, and it's very borring to convert my value each time. But maybe i'm wrong ? –  MObject Jul 8 '12 at 14:07
    
@MObject if you're using the object witeh + at too many places in your code then __add__ is good, otherwis if it appears only few times then it's better to be explicit. –  Ashwini Chaudhary Jul 8 '12 at 14:12

Try explicitly converting to a string:

print str(new) + '.kine'

Alternatively you could use a format string:

print '{}.kine'.format(new)
share|improve this answer

Python converts the result of the whole expression to a string before printing, not individual items. Convert your object instance to a string before concatenating:

print str(new) + '.kine'

Python is a strongly typed language and won't convert items to strings automatically when using operators like the '+' sign.

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Try print new to see that your .__str__() definition works. The print calls it internally. However, the + operator does not use the implicit conversion to string.

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