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I'm not a DBA by any means, but I thought I could hold my own with simple databases. However, this query has me stumped.

I have two tables. One holds the name of each page on my website. The other holds one record for each time a page is accessed. I want to join these two tables to find out the execution times for each of my pages, as an average and as a total required time, so I can determine where optimization efforts are required. This is my query:

 SELECT reqtemp.template_path, reqtemp.template_name,
        round(AVG(req.request_execution_time)) AS week_avg_exec_time, COUNT(DISTINCT req.skey) AS week_count, SUM(req.request_execution_time) AS week_total_time,
        round(AVG(req2.request_execution_time)) AS month_avg_exec_time, COUNT(DISTINCT req2.skey) AS month_count, SUM(req2.request_execution_time) AS month_total_time,
        round(AVG(req3.request_execution_time)) AS old_avg_exec_time, COUNT(DISTINCT req3.skey) AS old_count, SUM(req3.request_execution_time) AS old_total_time
 FROM   log_exectime_request_tmp reqtemp
        LEFT JOIN log_exectime_request req ON reqtemp.skey = req.log_exectime_req_tmp_skey
                                          AND req.request_date >= DATE_SUB(Now(), INTERVAL 7 DAY)
        LEFT JOIN log_exectime_request req2 ON reqtemp.skey = req2.log_exectime_req_tmp_skey
                                          AND req2.request_date >= DATE_SUB(Now(), INTERVAL 30 DAY)
        LEFT JOIN log_exectime_request req3 ON reqtemp.skey = req3.log_exectime_req_tmp_skey
                                          AND req3.request_date >= DATE_SUB(Now(), INTERVAL 365 DAY)
                                          AND req3.request_date <= DATE_SUB(Now(), INTERVAL 335 DAY)
 GROUP by reqtemp.template_path, reqtemp.template_name
 ORDER BY week_total_time DESC

To my understanding, this should run in milliseconds with only 2000 records in the larger table. At least I hope, as this will eventually need to run with hundreds of thousands or millions of records in production. Instead it took 53 minutes the last time I tried it. 'Explain' shows it doing a table scan on log_exectime_request_tmp, which is fine because the table has only 83 records and both of its columns are being used. The other three joins are using the index on skey and request_date, which also seems correct.

Can anyone offer some optimization advice? Why would such small tables be causing such a problem? Is my query poorly constructed?

DDL for tables follows, though I can't find any way to attach a file to fill in the data (am I missing it?):

 CREATE TABLE `log_exectime_request` 
 (
    `skey` integer (11) NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT , 
    `log_exectime_req_tmp_skey` integer (11), 
    `request_date` datetime, 
    `request_execution_time` integer (11), 
    `query_execution_time` integer (11), 
    `template_execution_time` integer (11), 
    `logging_execution_time` integer (11),
    PRIMARY KEY (`skey`)
 ) TYPE=InnoDB CHARACTER SET latin1 COLLATE latin1_swedish_ci;

 ALTER TABLE `elegantgalleries`.`log_exectime_request` ADD INDEX `date_tempSkey` (`log_exectime_req_tmp_skey`,`request_date` );


 CREATE TABLE `log_exectime_request_tmp` 
 (
    `skey` integer (11) NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT , 
    `template_path` varchar (500), 
    `template_name` varchar (250),
    PRIMARY KEY (`skey`)
 ) TYPE=InnoDB CHARACTER SET latin1 COLLATE latin1_swedish_ci;
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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

When asking questions like this, you should always mention what database you are using. Different databases have very different performance characteristics.

If I understand the query correctly, it is taking so long because you do not need to do so many joins. It appears that you are trying to sum the requests in three different groups . . . previous week, previous month, and one year ago (although it is curious that you are using 335 to 365 days rather than 365 days to 395).

I think the query that you want looks more like:

SELECT reqtemp.template_path, reqtemp.template_name,
       round(avg(case when req.request_date >= DATE_SUB(Now(), INTERVAL 7 DAY)
                      then req.request_execution_time
                 end)
            ) as week_avg_exec_time,
       COUNT(DISTINCT case when req.request_date >= DATE_SUB(Now(), INTERVAL 7 DAY)
                           then req.skey
             end) AS week_count,
       SUM(case when req.request_date >= DATE_SUB(Now(), INTERVAL 7 DAY)
                then req.request_execution_time
          ) AS month_total_time,
       round(avg(case when req.request_date >= DATE_SUB(Now(), INTERVAL 30 DAY)
                      then req.request_execution_time
                 end)
            ) as month_avg_exec_time,
       COUNT(DISTINCT case when req.request_date >= DATE_SUB(Now(), INTERVAL 30 DAY)
                           then req.skey
             end) AS week_count,
       SUM(case when req.request_date >= DATE_SUB(Now(), INTERVAL 30 DAY)
                then req.request_execution_time
          ) AS month_total_time,
       round(avg(case when req.request_date >= DATE_SUB(Now(), INTERVAL 365 DAY) AND
                           req.request_date <= DATE_SUB(Now(), INTERVAL 335 DAY)
                      then req.request_execution_time
                 end)
            ) as old_avg_exec_time,
       COUNT(DISTINCT case when req.request_date >= DATE_SUB(Now(), INTERVAL 365 DAY) AND
                                req.request_date <= DATE_SUB(Now(), INTERVAL 335 DAY)
                           then req.skey
             end) AS old_count,
       SUM(case when req.request_date >= DATE_SUB(Now(), INTERVAL 365 DAY) AND
                     req.request_date <= DATE_SUB(Now(), INTERVAL 335 DAY)
                then req.request_execution_time
          ) AS old_total_time
FROM log_exectime_request_tmp reqtemp LEFT JOIN
     log_exectime_request req
     ON reqtemp.skey = req.log_exectime_req_tmp_skey
GROUP by reqtemp.template_path, reqtemp.template_name
ORDER BY week_total_time DESC

You only need to join to the req table once to get the request date. You can then use case statement to break the times into different periods.

Your original query is doing a cross join between all the record for each of the time periods. Although there may be only a few hundred or thousand in a given period, when you cross join them you get millions or billions of rows.

share|improve this answer
    
My sincere apologies; I meant to list my database (MySQL) but got distracted. :( –  Nicholas Jul 9 '12 at 1:17
    
You guys amaze me the way you can reconstruct statements like this so efficiently. I guess I got one thing right: it really could be written in such a way that it took milliseconds. ;) Thank you so much for your help. You're a lifesaver. –  Nicholas Jul 9 '12 at 1:20
    
And as an aside, since you asked, the 335-365 range is not static. I change those numbers constantly depending on what it is am actually trying to see. This isn't so much of a saved report as it is a query I keep around to run as needed. –  Nicholas Jul 9 '12 at 1:23

Since you are filtering on request_date, try adding an index with just that column.

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