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I want to make a table where I can join these 4 relationships together..The thing is that a customer can ask many questions and staff can reply to the question and both can comment on the question..

          1   m
 Question ------ Comment 

How to add staff and customer entity?

Mine looks like this but i find my relationship is abit of odd

          1   m
 Question ------ Comment 
    |               |
    | m             | m
    |               |
    | 1             | 1  
    |               |        
  Customer        Staff
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1 Answer 1

a customer can ask many questions and staff can reply to the question and both can comment on the question

Your entities are Customer, Staff, Question, Reply (which you omitted in your diagram) and Comment.

You may consider defining a User entity that would be a "superclass" (in object-oriented terminology) of Customer and Staff. Some RDBMS-es support a kind of table inheritance, e.g. PostgreSQL, or you'd have to implement it yourself via foreign keys, or just have a User table with a "type" column that you can set to "customer" or "staff". This is implementation detail. However you choose to implement this:

  1. Customer may create Questions and there's a 1:N relationship between them.
  2. Staff may create Reply items, there's again a 1:N relationship between them.
  3. One Question may have many Replies.
  4. One Question may have many Comments.
  5. Comments may be created by Users (i.e. both Customers and Staff). Again, one User may have many Comments, and one Question may also have many Comments.

These seem to be your entities and their relationships. Hope this helps a bit and does not come too late (most probably you have also figured it out in the meantime :-) ).

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