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Someone asked me about this and after reading some big O stuff I still can't figure out which of the 2 designs is faster.

If I have this kind of nested loop in one method

public void someMethod(){
    for (a=0;a<10;a++){
     for (b=0;b<10;b++){
      for (c=0;c<10;c++){
       for (d=0;d<10;d++){
       }
      }
     }
    }
}

and I decided to redesign the method and place the 2 inner for loops to another method something like this

public void someMethod(){
     for (a=0;a<10;a++){
         for (b=0;b<10;b++){
          2loopsMethod();
         }
        }
    }

public void 2loopsMethod(){
for (c=0;c<10;c++){
 for (d=0;d<10;d++){
 }
}

}

My question is will the redesigned method be alot faster that the original code since I placed it in another method or will it make no difference?

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2  
Why do you think that could help? –  harold Jul 8 '12 at 16:03

4 Answers 4

up vote 8 down vote accepted

It should make no difference. You still have four levels of nested loops, so delegating part of the work to a method call will not be faster.

(Technically the added overhead of the method call will make the second example slightly slower, but if your code is doing anything significant at all I'd be surprised if you can even measure the difference.)

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I see thanks for answering still have lot to learn about java. Do you know have some links where I can easily this kind of stuff? Or Its just learning by experience? –  dimas Jul 8 '12 at 16:07
    
@dimas Experience is the best teacher, but there's still a lot to be learned from books, tutorials, and asking questions like this one. For Java specifically, the official Java Tutorials are an extremely good resource, as are the Java tutorial videos on thenewboston.org/tutorials.php –  Bill the Lizard Jul 8 '12 at 20:15
    
thanks for the links especially the videos, I learn a lot faster if I watch people do it. –  dimas Jul 8 '12 at 20:29

Big O complexity is the same. I think the first version is faster because you don't have the a*b method calls. And in theory method calls take extra time.

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The redesigned method is a just a little little bit slower in your case because method invocation takes additional time (unlikely e.g. to C++ inline functions). You'll definitely see the difference if you increase the number of loop iterations.

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Due to compiler optimizations on methods, second example is preffered:

public class Try1 {

	static int sum;
	public static void main(String[] args) {

		long startTime, endTime;

		while(true)
		{
			sum = 0;
			startTime = System.nanoTime();
			for (int i = 0; i < 2000; i++) {	
				for (int j = 0; j < 1000; j++) {
					sum = sum + i;
				}
			}
			
			endTime = System.nanoTime();
			System.out.println("no method took:" + (endTime -startTime) );

			sum = 0;
			startTime = System.nanoTime();
			for (int i = 0; i < 2000; i++) {	
				func(i);
			}
			endTime = System.nanoTime();
			System.out.println("with method took:" + (endTime -startTime) );
			
		}

	}

	private static final void func(int i) {
		for (int j = 0; j < 1000; j++) {
			sum = sum + i;
		}
	}

}

end the results:

no method took:3077459 with method took:2418027 no method took:5535578 with method took:76014 no method took:3857167 with method took:88844 no method took:3758701 with method took:89165 no method took:3761588 with method took:88844

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