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How does following code works and, more importantly, why does it work that way?

class Example
  def one
    def one
      @value = 99
    end
    puts "Expensive Call"
    @value = 99 # assume its expensive call
  end
end

ex = Example.new
puts ex.one # => "Expensive Call"; 99
puts ex.one # => 99

Here, on first call to method one, Ruby executes the outer one method, but on successive calls, it executes only the inner one method, bypassing the outer one method totally.

I want to know how does it happen and why does it happen so.

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3 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted

How It Works

Ruby allows you to redefine classes at run-time, because class and def are actually executable code. In your example, the code does the following:

  1. Defines an Example#one method that will (re)define the Example#one method when the instance method is called.
  2. For practical purposes, the inner def will not be executed until the outer instance method is called. (Hair-splitters may legitimately argue this definition, but that gets into details of the parser/interpreter that just don't matter for the purposes of this discussion.)
  3. You define an instance of Example named "ex."
  4. You invoke the instance method on ex, which defines a new method with the same name.
  5. When you call the instance method again, the new method is used instead of the old one.

Why It Works

Basically, the last definition of a method replaces any earlier definitions in that namespace, but the methods are actually new objects. You can see this in action as follows:

def my_method
  puts 'Old Method'
  puts  self.method(:my_method).object_id
  def my_method
    puts 'New Method'
    puts  self.method(:my_method).object_id
  end  
end

If you run this in an irb or pry session, you can see the method redefined at run-time:

> my_method; puts; my_method
Old Method
8998420

New Method
8998360

As you can see by the different object IDs, even though the methods have the same name and are attached to the same object (generally main at the console), they are actually different method objects. However, since the methods were defined with the same name, only the most recent definition is found when the instance does a method lookup.

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1  
Not methods but keywords. The actual methods for that are Module#define_method and Class.new. def and class are sort of shorthands for those methods. –  Linuxios Jul 8 '12 at 23:29
    
as Linuxios says, def and class are not methods –  banister Jul 9 '12 at 2:54
    
Not sure whay you mean by 'methods are actually new objects'. –  shailesh Jul 9 '12 at 4:45
1  
@shailesh Methods are objects (see ruby-doc.org/core-1.9.3/Method.html) that are looked up in a deterministic way within a given namespace. –  CodeGnome Jul 9 '12 at 10:01
    
@CodeGnome cool :). Didn't knew about it. Will explore more about it today. Thanx a ton. –  shailesh Jul 9 '12 at 10:48
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When you execute it the first time, it redefines itself in the class and then finishes. The second time, the method one has been overriden by itself to just @value = 99, so nothing is printed.

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It's important to realize first that there is no such thing as inner or outer methods in Ruby.

You're defining a new method within a method—in this case, since the method being defined has the same name as an existing one, the new definition completely overwrites the original one.

What you have is equivalent to the (perhaps) more obvious:

class Example
  def one
    self.class.send(:define_method, :one) do
      @value = 99
    end
    puts "Expensive Call"
    @value = 99 # assume its expensive call
  end
end

Here it's clearer that you're defining a method within the context of the class.

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The tricky part is explaining why the nested definition isn't executed before the first call to Example#one. The nested method definition is essentially deferred, but the reason for the deferral isn't self-evident. –  CodeGnome Jul 8 '12 at 17:37
1  
@CodeGnome it is self-evident, the code inside the method body isn't executed until the method is executed. –  banister Jul 9 '12 at 2:55
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