Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

How can I tell difflib.get_close_matches() to ignore case? I have a dictionary which has a defined format which includes capitalisation. However, the test string might have full capitalisation or no capitalisation, and these should be equivalent. The results need to be properly capitalised, however, so I can't use a modified dictionary.

import difflib

names = ['Acacia koa A.Gray var. latifolia (Benth.) H.St.John',
    'Acacia koa A.Gray var. waianaeensis H.St.John',
    'Acacia koaia Hillebr.',
    'Acacia kochii W.Fitzg. ex Ewart & Jean White',
    'Acacia kochii W.Fitzg.']
s = 'Acacia kochi W.Fitzg.'

# base case: proper capitalisation
print(difflib.get_close_matches(s,names,1,0.9))

# this should be equivalent from the perspective of my program
print(difflib.get_close_matches(s.upper(),names,1,0.9))

# this won't work because of the dictionary formatting
print(difflib.get_close_matches(s.upper().capitalize(),names,1,0.9))

Output:

['Acacia kochii W.Fitzg.']
[]
[]

Working code:

Based on Hugh Bothwell's answer, I have modified the code as follows to get a working solution (which should also work when more than one result is returned):

import difflib

names = ['Acacia koa A.Gray var. latifolia (Benth.) H.St.John',
    'Acacia koa A.Gray var. waianaeensis H.St.John',
    'Acacia koaia Hillebr.',
    'Acacia kochii W.Fitzg. ex Ewart & Jean White',
    'Acacia kochii W.Fitzg.']
test = {n.lower():n for n in names}    
s1 = 'Acacia kochi W.Fitzg.'   # base case
s2 = 'ACACIA KOCHI W.FITZG.'   # test case

results = [test[r] for r in difflib.get_close_matches(s1.lower(),test,1,0.9)]
results += [test[r] for r in difflib.get_close_matches(s2.lower(),test,1,0.9)]
print results

Output:

['Acacia kochii W.Fitzg.', 'Acacia kochii W.Fitzg.']
share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I don't see any quick way to make difflib do case-insensitive comparison.

The quick-and-dirty solution seems to be

  • make a function that converts the string to some canonical form (for example: upper case, single spaced, no punctuation)

  • use that function to make a dict of {canonical string: original string} and a list of [canonical string]

  • run .get_close_matches against the canonical-string list, then plug the results through the dict to get the original strings back

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. It's not elegant, but it works! –  rudivonstaden Jul 8 '12 at 18:07

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.