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I've got a program that uses a few CUDA kernels and this one is taking 50-100ms to run while the others take 0-5ms. I expect this has something to do with all the branching, but I'm not really sure how to reduce it. I'm compiling for a compute capability 2.1 device. If someone could point me in the right direction that would be great.

// chosen using occupancy spreadsheet
#define SCORE_THREADS_PER_BLOCK 448

__device__ double ScoringMatrixVal(double *scoring_matrix, size_t pitch, unsigned int row, unsigned int column) {
  return *((double*)((char*) scoring_matrix + row * pitch) + column);
}

__global__ void ScoreBindingSites(char *input_sequence, unsigned long is_length, unsigned int *rvd_sequence, unsigned int rs_len, double cutoff, unsigned int rvd_num, double *scoring_matrix, size_t sm_pitch, unsigned char *results) {

  int block_seq_index = SCORE_THREADS_PER_BLOCK * (blockIdx.y * gridDim.x + blockIdx.x);
  int thread_id = (blockDim.x * threadIdx.y) + threadIdx.x;
  int seq_index = block_seq_index + thread_id;

  if (seq_index < 1 || seq_index >= is_length || seq_index + rs_len >= is_length - 1) return;

  if (input_sequence[seq_index - 1] == 'T' || input_sequence[seq_index - 1] == 't') {

    double thread_result = 0;

    for (int i = 0; i < rs_len; i++) {

      int rvd_index = i;

      int sm_col = 4;

      char base = input_sequence[seq_index + i];

      if (base == 'A' || base == 'a')    
        sm_col = 0;
      if (base == 'C' || base == 'c')
        sm_col = 1;
      if (base == 'G' || base == 'g')
        sm_col = 2;
      if (base == 'T' || base == 't')
        sm_col = 3;

      thread_result += ScoringMatrixVal(scoring_matrix, sm_pitch, rvd_sequence[rvd_index], sm_col);

    }

    results[seq_index] |= (thread_result < cutoff ? 1UL : 0UL) << (2 * rvd_num);

  } 

  if (input_sequence[seq_index + rs_len] == 'A' || input_sequence[seq_index + rs_len] == 'a') {

    double thread_result = 0;

    for (int i = 0; i < rs_len; i++) {

      int rvd_index = rs_len - i - 1;

      int sm_col = 4;

      char base = input_sequence[seq_index + i];

      if (base == 'A' || base == 'a')    
        sm_col = 3;
      if (base == 'C' || base == 'c')
        sm_col = 2;
      if (base == 'G' || base == 'g')
        sm_col = 1;
      if (base == 'T' || base == 't')
        sm_col = 0;

      thread_result += ScoringMatrixVal(scoring_matrix, sm_pitch, rvd_sequence[rvd_index], sm_col);

    }

    results[seq_index] |= (thread_result < cutoff ? 1UL : 0UL) << (2 * rvd_num + 1);

  }

}

ScoreBindingSites is launched with (32, 14) threads per block and enough blocks to cover the input sequence. The full source can be found here if that would be helpful.

share|improve this question
    
Your problem is much more likely to be related to memory access than branching. That kernel is doing uncoalesced, byte sized global memory loads, which will be horribly inefficient. CUDA ships with a profiler on every platform that is supported. I recommend you familiarise yourself with one and use it to study the codes performance in more detail. – talonmies Jul 8 '12 at 20:26
    
I've used the profiler. At some point the "Kernel Memory" analysis started freezing between the 5th and 10th run and I don't know why. But the "Kernel Instruction" analysis reports divergence as an issue now. Another reason I expect it's not memory access is because early versions of this kernel with bad memory access the kernel might take several seconds. Now as far as I can tell for any given load from input_sequence all threads in a warp are loading consecutive bytes resulting in one transaction, and the execution time is significantly better. Scoring matrix should fit in cache. – njbooher Jul 8 '12 at 20:44
    
How long is rs_len generally? Maybe you could load chunks of input_sequence into shared memory. Since every thread is accessing very local parts of the input sequence you should get a lot of reuse. But those byte-sized accesses generally appear to have good locality contrary to @talonmies' comment. The ScoringMatrix accesses are likely to be uncoalesced though, so anything you can do to improve their locality may help. Branchine may be a problem if there is lots of divergence in the outer if statements, which there probably is for genetic sequences... – harrism Jul 9 '12 at 2:23
    
@harrism rs_len is between 12 and 32. I'll try out the suggestions tomorrow. Thanks! – njbooher Jul 9 '12 at 2:57
    
While you are at it you might consider combining the 'T' and 'A' loops like this – harrism Jul 9 '12 at 4:04
up vote 1 down vote accepted

There are a few things you can do to improve this code:

  • As has been suggested above, merge the two loops for 'T' and 'A'. This is probably your greatest source of branch divergence as the small cascade of if-statements inside the loop will very probably be compiled as predicated instructions (see Section 5.4.2 of the NVidia CUDA C Programming guide).

  • Byte-sized global memory access is a terrible idea. Instead, I would suggest declaring input_sequence, results and base as char4 and, in each iteration of your main loop, do your thing for each value of base.x, base.y, base.z and base.w.

  • You may also want to have a closer look at what ScoringMatrixVal is doing. Is it just reading values from memory? If so, could you replace it with constant memory? Or a texture?

Update

As requested, here is what I meant with the second point. I haven't tested the code, though, so feel free to keep any bugs or typos you find. Note that I've assumed, for simplicity, that rs_len is a multiple of four.

// chosen using occupancy spreadsheet
#define SCORE_THREADS_PER_BLOCK 448

__device__ double ScoringMatrixVal(double *scoring_matrix, size_t pitch, unsigned int row, unsigned int column) {
  return scoring_matrix[ row*pitch/sizeof(double) + column ];
}

__global__ void ScoreBindingSites(char4 *input_sequence, unsigned long is_length, unsigned int *rvd_sequence, unsigned int rs_len, double cutoff, unsigned int rvd_num, double *scoring_matrix, size_t sm_pitch, unsigned char *results) {

  int block_seq_index = SCORE_THREADS_PER_BLOCK * (blockIdx.y * gridDim.x + blockIdx.x);
  int thread_id = (blockDim.x * threadIdx.y) + threadIdx.x;
  int seq_index = block_seq_index + thread_id;

  if (seq_index < 1 || seq_index >= is_length || seq_index + rs_len >= is_length - 1) return;

  if (input_sequence[seq_index - 1] == 'T' || input_sequence[seq_index - 1] == 't') {

    double4 thread_result = make_double4( 0 );

    for (int i = 0; i < rs_len/4; i++) {

      int rvd_index = 4*i;

      int4 sm_col = make_int4( 4 );

      char4 base = input_sequence[seq_index + i];

      if (base.x == 'A' || base.x == 'a')    
        sm_col.x = 0;
      else if (base.x == 'C' || base.x == 'c')
        sm_col.x = 1;
      else if (base.x == 'G' || base.x == 'g')
        sm_col.x = 2;
      else if (base.x == 'T' || base.x == 't')
        sm_col.x = 3;
      thread_result.x += ScoringMatrixVal(scoring_matrix, sm_pitch, rvd_sequence[rvd_index + 0], sm_col.x);

      if (base.y == 'A' || base.y == 'a')    
        sm_col.y = 0;
      else if (base.y == 'C' || base.y == 'c')
        sm_col.y = 1;
      else if (base.y == 'G' || base.y == 'g')
        sm_col.y = 2;
      else if (base.y == 'T' || base.y == 't')
        sm_col.y = 3;
      thread_result.y += ScoringMatrixVal(scoring_matrix, sm_pitch, rvd_sequence[rvd_index + 1], sm_col.y);

      if (base.z == 'A' || base.z == 'a')    
        sm_col.z = 0;
      else if (base.z == 'C' || base.z == 'c')
        sm_col.z = 1;
      else if (base.z == 'G' || base.z == 'g')
        sm_col.z = 2;
      else if (base.z == 'T' || base.z == 't')
        sm_col.z = 3;
      thread_result.z += ScoringMatrixVal(scoring_matrix, sm_pitch, rvd_sequence[rvd_index + 2], sm_col.z);

      if (base.w == 'A' || base.w == 'a')    
        sm_col.w = 0;
      else if (base.w == 'C' || base.w == 'c')
        sm_col.w = 1;
      else if (base.w == 'G' || base.w == 'g')
        sm_col.w = 2;
      else if (base.w == 'T' || base.w == 't')
        sm_col.w = 3;
      thread_result.w += ScoringMatrixVal(scoring_matrix, sm_pitch, rvd_sequence[rvd_index + 3], sm_col.w);

    }

    double acc_thread_result = thread_result.x + thread_result.y + thead_result.z + thread_result.w;

    results[seq_index] |= (acc_thread_result < cutoff ? 1UL : 0UL) << (2 * rvd_num);

  }

  if (input_sequence[seq_index + rs_len] == 'A' || input_sequence[seq_index + rs_len] == 'a') {

    ...

  }

}

A few notes:

  • I've re-written, hopefully correctly, your function ScoringMatrixVal to use regular array access, as the whole mess with pointer arithmetic may be throwing the compiler off.
  • I've converted your if-statements to a cascade of if-elseif-statements, as they seem mutually exclusive. I'm guessing the compiler will use predicated instructions and will interleave the four if-elseif blocks.
  • You may consider replacing all this with a char[256] where everything is set to 4 except for the character codes at A, a, C, c, etc...
  • If you convert the if-elseif-statements to a table lookup, you could use two different tables for input_sequence[seq_index - 1] == 'T' and input_sequence[seq_index + rs_len] == 'A', thus keeping it all in one loop.

I hope I haven't messed-up the code too much and that this helps!

share|improve this answer
    
It's pretty clear that each thread will be accessing different locations in ScoringMatrixVal, so constant memory would lead to serialization. – harrism Jul 9 '12 at 12:46
    
@harrism: Are you sure? The calls between threads differ only in the last argument, which is in [0,3], e.g. at most four different offsets. In any case, I was offering suggestions which the OP should try out and see what works best for him/her. – Pedro Jul 9 '12 at 13:34
    
Can you explain point 2 in more detail? As written it sounds like the input sequence would be broken up into 4 char wide blocks that would make access strided. The closest thing I came up with today was each thread loading 4 bytes into shared memory at a time, but that didn't seem to improve performance any. For point 3, the scoring matrix is constant, and has 5 columns, 4 for legit bases, and a 5th for junk in the sequence. I tried loading it into shared memory today and it didn't help, but I'll try texture memory tomorrow. – njbooher Jul 10 '12 at 1:18
1  
@Pedro constant cache is optimized for broadcasting the same value to all threads in a warp. So if threads within a warp access different constant memory addresses, they get serialized (it's sort of the opposite of shared memory). njbooher says the matrix has only 5 columns, but he provides no info about the number of rows. – harrism Jul 10 '12 at 2:18
1  
@djmj: I would assume that the compiler translates this to rs_len >> 2. What I'm hoping will improve the kernel is the number of reads from global memory. Or am I completely misunderstanding your comment? – Pedro Jul 10 '12 at 13:27

As far as I understood in your kernel each Thread reads up to 32 characters and checks each char and outputs some data.

You could completely remove the loop by implicit simulating it using a different block approach and different indexing (If that is possible in your case).

Each block has 32 threads where each thread calculates the result of one loop iteration.

I don't know if its faster but a test worth.

Pedro's answer using a table-lookup to replace your conditions should definetly be taken into consideration.

Minor changes:

Is input_sequence[seq_index - 1] == 'T' || input_sequence[seq_index - 1] == 't' optimized to just one memory read?

Save a register by removing only once-used variable threadId.

share|improve this answer
    
The compiler will do those minor changes automatically, i.e. it probably won't even create a local variable for threadId. You may need to add the __restrict__ keyword to the parameter input_sequence though. – Pedro Jul 10 '12 at 13:30
    
Thanks, will have a look at __restrict__. Since once declaring a temporary object outside of a loop in Java and gaining 25% performance gain I don't trust compilers anymore :D – djmj Jul 10 '12 at 13:33
    
Actually, that was probably the compiler not trusting you... ;) – Pedro Jul 10 '12 at 13:50

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