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I am having trouble figuring out why the first for loop containing a while works when a user enters 'no' and why the second instance does not work.

I believe the construction of the two loops is nearly identical. The second occurence was just broken down into another function.

It's supposed to not delete the string when the user inputs 'no'.

This one works. If user inputs 'no', it doesnt delete anything.

def remove():
    f = open('codilist.txt')
    coname = raw_input('What company do you want to remove? ') # company name
    tmpfile = open('codilist.tmp', 'w')
    for line in f:
        if coname.upper() in line:
            while True:
                answer = raw_input('Are you sure you want to remove company?\nyes or no?')
                if answer == 'yes':
                    print line.upper() + '...has been removed.'
                    break                
                elif answer == 'no':
                    f.close()
                    tmpfile.close()
                    return
                else:
                    print 'Please choose yes or no.'                    
        else:
            tmpfile.write(line)
    f.close()
    tmpfile.close()
    os.rename('codilist.tmp', 'codilist.txt')

This one does not work. If user inputs 'no', it deletes the string anyways.

def find_and_remove(f,coname,tmpfile):
    for line in f:
        if coname.upper() in line:
            while True:
                answer = raw_input('Are you sure you want to remove company?\nyes or no?')
                if answer == 'yes':
                    print line.upper() + '...has been removed.'
                    break               
                elif answer == 'no':
                    f.close()
                    tmpfile.close()
                    return
                else:
                    print 'Please choose yes or no.'                   
        else:
            tmpfile.write(line)

def remove():
    f = open('codilist.txt')
    coname = raw_input('What company do you want to remove? ') # company name
    tmpfile = open('codilist.tmp', 'w')
    find_and_remove(f,coname,tmpfile)
    f.close()
    tmpfile.close()
    os.rename('codilist.tmp', 'codilist.txt')
share|improve this question
3  
As in your last question, you should separate your interface from your business logic. –  Joel Cornett Jul 8 '12 at 21:35
    
I recommend you use a with context for your files so that you don't get into weird situations of when to close the files. Also, in your second example you gave responsibility of closing the files to both functions –  jdi Jul 8 '12 at 21:44
    
both of the codes exit at no and both are producing same output. –  Ashwini Chaudhary Jul 8 '12 at 21:56

5 Answers 5

In the interests of demonstrating better coding style, I've taken the liberty of rewriting your script below:

def get_user_in(message, valid_responses):
    while True:
        user_in = raw_input(message)
        if user_in in valid_responses:
            return user_in
        else:
            print "Please choose from: {0} or {1}".format(*valid_responses)

def find_and_remove(co_name, infile, outfile):
    pattern = co_name.upper()
    for line in infile:
        if pattern in line.upper():
            print line
            answer = get_user_in("Remove this line? ", ("yes", "no"))
            if answer == "no":
                outfile.write(line)
        else:
            outfile.write(line)

def remove(filename):
    outFilename = filename + '.tmp'
    with open(filename, 'r') as infile, open(outFilename, 'w') as tmpfile:
        co_name = raw_input('What company do you want to remove? ')
        find_and_remove(co_name, infile, tmpfile)
    os.rename(outFilename, filename)
share|improve this answer

See Joel's wiki answer for a great example of how to redo this whole thing.

But as for fixing your error...

I finally realized what it is that is the big different between your two examples. It has to do with when you perform the rename.

In your first example, when the user says "no", returning from the entire function prevents your os.rename from every happening. The result is that you see a completely unchanged original .txt file.

In your second example, if the user says "no", you return from the sub function back into the main one, but os.rename no matter what happened. That means if they said no, you don't write any more lines but you still copy over the half processed tmp file.

While I honestly think the entire thing should be rewritten, a simple tweak to your current code would be for the find_and_remove to return whether the process succeeded, maybe with a bool:

def find_and_remove(f,coname,tmpfile):
    ...             
                elif answer == 'no':
                    return False
    return True

def remove():
    ...
    success = find_and_remove(f,coname,tmpfile)
    f.close()
    tmpfile.close()
    if success:
        os.rename('codilist.tmp', 'codilist.txt')

Honestly though, you should look into using the with context for opening and closing files so you don't have to mix up a bunch of conditions of when to close the files down. You have them being closed in two different functions.

The with statement

with open('infile.txt') as inFile, open('outfile.txt', 'w') as outFile:
    for line in inFile:
        outFile.write(line)

When the with block ends, it closes the files.

share|improve this answer

It looks to me like the problem is the return in the "no" clause. That exits the function before the tmpfile.write(line) method executes, so it makes sense to me that it looks like the string is deleted. What I don't understand is why it would work in the first function.

share|improve this answer
    
It seems like both of the examples return from the entire write process if the answer is no without writing the line –  jdi Jul 8 '12 at 21:41
    
Yeah, I agree. And one way or the other, if the return executes (and behaves as you and I intuit), you don't write any more company names! So it seems like a very strange situation. (Oh, now that we know it is Python, the suspicion that something's amiss becomes more certain...) –  Larry OBrien Jul 8 '12 at 21:43

In the second case, you only return out of find_and_remove when the user types no. In the first case you return out of the entire function.

share|improve this answer
    
Nevermind, I found a difference. –  Antimony Jul 8 '12 at 21:38
    
So is there a way I can return out of the entire remove and find_and_remove function or would it be best to rewrite it all? –  Prox Jul 8 '12 at 21:48
    
Solved it with this... –  Prox Jul 8 '12 at 22:21

I had the same idea as Joel, but a bit slower... regardless, hope this is of interest:

COMPANY_FILE = 'codilist.txt'

def load_companies():
    with open(COMPANY_FILE) as inf:
        return filter(None, (line.strip() for line in inf))

def save_companies(companies):
    with open(COMPANY_FILE, 'w') as outf:
        outf.write('\n'.join(companies))

def get_option(prompt, options):
    options = [opt.strip().lower() for opt in options]
    prompt = "{}? [{}]".format(prompt, '/'.join(options))
    options = set(options)
    while True:
        res = raw_input(prompt).strip().lower()
        if res in options:
            return res

def remove_company(remove, companies):
    ask = lambda c: get_option('Remove company {}'.format(c), ['yes', 'no'])
    return [co for co in companies if remove not in co or ask(co)=='no']

def main():
    companies = load_companies()
    co_len = len(companies)

    remove = raw_input('Name of company to remove?').strip()
    companies = remove_company(remove, companies)

    if len(companies) < co_len:
        save_companies(companies)

if __name__=="__main__":
    main()
share|improve this answer

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