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I have a dictionary that is keyed by date and filled with classes that have an attribute that is a numpy.array. I want to use np.dstack to make one large array from all the arrays in the dictionary. My current code is like this:

import numpy as np
#PARTS is my dictionary
#the .partposit is the attribute that is an array of shape (50000, 12)
ks = sorted(PARTS.keys())
p1 = PARTS[ks[0]].partposit
for k in ks[1:]:
    p1 = np.dstack((p1, PARTS[k].partposit))

My result is as I expect:

In [67]: p1.shape
Out[67]: (50000, 12, 163)

However, it is quite slow. Is there a more efficient way to do this?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

you could try this:

>>> import numpy as np
>>> class A:
...     def __init__(self, values):
...         self.partposit = values
... 
>>> PARTS = dict((index, A(np.zeros((50000, 12)))) for index in xrange(163))
>>> p1 = np.dstack((PARTS[k].partposit for k in sorted(PARTS.keys())))
>>> p1.shape
(50000, 12, 163)
>>> 

it took a few seconds to stack it on my machine.

>>> import timeit
>>> timeit.Timer('p1 = np.dstack((PARTS[k].partposit for k in sorted(PARTS.keys())))', "from __main__ import np, PARTS").timeit(number = 1)
2.1245520114898682

numpy.dstack takes in a sequence of arrays and stacks them together as such it would be much faster if we just give it the list instead of continuously stacking them ourselves.

numpy.dstack(tup)

Stack arrays in sequence depth wise (along third axis). Takes a sequence of arrays and stack them along the third axis to make a single array.

http://docs.scipy.org/doc/numpy/reference/generated/numpy.dstack.html

I was also curious as to see how long your method would be:

>>> import timeit
>>> setup = """
... import numpy as np
... #PARTS is my dictionary
... #the .partposit is the attribute that is an array of shape (50000, 12)
... 
... class A:
...     def __init__(self, values):
...         self.partposit = values
... 
... PARTS = dict((index, A(np.zeros((50000, 12)))) for index in xrange(163))
... ks = sorted(PARTS.keys())
... """
>>> stack = """
... p1 = PARTS[ks[0]].partposit
... for k in ks[1:]:
...     p1 = np.dstack((p1, PARTS[k].partposit))
... """
>>> timeit.Timer(stack, setup).timeit(number = 1)
67.69684886932373

ouch!

>>> numpy.__version__
'1.6.1'

$ python --version
Python 2.6.1

I hope this helps.

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This line creates a new list (shallow copy), which is unnecessary overhead:

for k in ks[1:]:

A more efficient way to do this is:

itks =iter(ks)
next(itks)
for k in itks:

In addition, you can eliminate repeated lookups with:

entries = iter(sorted(((k, v.partposit) for k,v in PARTS.iteritems()), key=lambda(k,v):k))
p1 = next(entries)[1]
for k,v in entries: 
    p1 = np.dstack((p1, v))

This will make things slightly faster because it eliminates both copying and repeated lookups in the dict (which although constant time, are not free).

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I get SyntaxError: Generator expression must be parenthesized if not sole argument Im on python 2.6 I think it needs to be sorted( ((k, v.partposit) for k,v in PARTS.iteritems()), key=lambda(k,v):k) also sorted returns a list not a generator in python2 since I get TypeError: list object is not an iterator unless they've changed this in a new version ... –  Samy Vilar Jul 8 '12 at 23:19
1  
I'm getting the same errror, but using @samy.vilar 's method fixes it. Thanks, this is the type of 'better python' I was looking for, good use of a generator, etc. –  John Jul 9 '12 at 7:50
    
@samy.vilar Good catch. –  Marcin Jul 9 '12 at 12:42
    
@John I've updated the code. –  Marcin Jul 9 '12 at 12:42

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