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Take as an example the following C# function:

    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        var r = new Random();
        {
            var i = r.Next(); ;
            Console.WriteLine("i = {0}", i);
        }

        var action = new Action(delegate()
            {
                var i = r.Next();
                Console.WriteLine("Delegate: i = {0}", i);
            });
        action();
    }

The following block only exists as C# syntactic sugar to enforce an extra layer of variable scope in the source code, as discussed in this SO Question.

        {
            var i = r.Next(); ;
            Console.WriteLine("i = {0}", i);
        }

I proved this by decompiling the generated assembly with ILSpy and getting this:

    private static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        Random r = new Random();
        int i = r.Next();
        Console.WriteLine("i = {0}", i);
        Action action = delegate
        {
            int j = r.Next();
            Console.WriteLine("Delegate: i = {0}", j);
        }
        ;
        action();
    }

So does this C# construct have a name? If so what is it?

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2  
I'd call it a block, and they are also used in C, eg see stackoverflow.com/questions/1677778/… –  fvu Jul 8 '12 at 22:20
    
I wonder what standard they were introduced in. –  Justin Dearing Jul 8 '12 at 22:21
    
in C you mean? Can't tell you for sure but the first time I saw them being used predates even ANSI C I think. –  fvu Jul 8 '12 at 22:22
    
@fvu Really? I'd figure that would be a C99 thing. Isn't that when C finally let you declare variables mid code. –  Justin Dearing Jul 8 '12 at 22:24
    
check the accepted answer to question I linked before, this construct was actually used to bypass that restriction in older dialects. And I think it was in the output of some odd CASE tool that converted Nassi-Shneiderman flowcharts to something that looked more or less like C that I saw them first I think, probably because it reduced the scope the tool had to take into account to manage the vars it generated. –  fvu Jul 8 '12 at 22:29

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

It's called a statement block.

There is actually no difference between a statement block after e.g. an if (...) and a statement block that stands alone. A statement block can be used everywhere where a statement can be used.

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@JustinDearing: Any source for "unnamed statement block"? A quick google search returns about 5 results, and none are related to C#. There is really nothing special about a statement block that is not used within statement like if or while, so I don't think there is a specific name. –  dtb Jul 8 '12 at 22:38
    
I can't find it now, so reject the edit. –  Justin Dearing Jul 9 '12 at 1:41

I'm not aware of a specific name for the { } used in that specific context, but the name of the thing they introduce is called nested scope. (Reference also usage of nested scope in the documentation for goto).

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I think statement block, as suggested by another answer, is a fairly good name for it. Additionally, I think that this kind of nested statement block might at the same time also define a (nested) lexical scope.

I'm basing this on two pieces of evidence:

  1. Eric Lippert has a partly relevant blog article on the meaning of the word "scope". Basically, he defines "scope" as:

    The scope of a named entity is the region of program text in which it is legal to refer to that entity by its unqualified name

    This seems to apply to nested { } statement blocks fairly well, because whatever local variables you declare inside them are only accessible within, and thus have a scope that is identical to that { } block's boundaries.

  2. If you wanted to dynamically emit IL / metadata for that kind of construct, I believe you would use the ILGenerator.BeginScope method, which is described on MSDN simply as:

    Begins a lexical scope.

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