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I have a class Point with xand y attributes. I'd like to get False comparing a Point object with any other type of object. For instance, Point(0, 1) == None fails:

AttributeError: 'NoneType' object has no attribute 'x'

The class:

class Point():

    def __init__(self, x, y):
        self.x = x
        self.y = y

    def __eq__(self, other):
        return self.x == other.x and self.y == other.y

    def __ne__(self, other):
        return not self.__eq__(other)

How do I configure __eq__to get False in comparison with any other object type?

share|improve this question
up vote 1 down vote accepted
def __eq__(self, other):
    if not isinstance(other, Point):
        return False
    try:
        return self.x == other.x and self.y == other.y
    except AttributeError:
        return False

First check the type and return False if its not a Point instance. We do this in case they are comparing some other type that happens to have an x or y attribute but isn't necessarily the same context.

Second catch an attribute error, just in case someone subclasses Point and removes the attribute or changes Point in some way.

share|improve this answer
    
If it's a Point instance, surely it should have the attributes? If someone removes the attribute, wouldn't it be better just to let it complain? – MRAB Jul 8 '12 at 23:11
    
@MRAB: That depends on what the OP wants for the behavior. The OP asked to return False if the instance are not equal. Not raise an exception. I consider it not equal, if they don't have matching attributes. An exception is already what the OP said they didnt want. No exceptions to catch. – jdi Jul 8 '12 at 23:12
    
@MRAB: All three of our answers take different points of view. The OP can choose the handling they want – jdi Jul 8 '12 at 23:14

I would check to see whether the other object acts like a Point object instead of rejecting all non-Point objects:

def __eq__(self, other):
  try:
    return self.x == other.x and self.y == other.y
  except AttributeError:
    return False

That way Point(1, 1) == Vector(1, 1), in case you use coordinate vectors.

share|improve this answer

Try this:

def __eq__(self, other):
        return isinstance(other, Point) and self.x == other.x and self.y == other.y
share|improve this answer

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