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Here is a trivial class with a method that should return the string that has been assigned to the property "question". Why does it not print the returned property value from the method output?

I get no error messages, all I get is "Here is:" but the property's value is missing :(

class DisplayQuestion {
    public $question;

    function __construct ($question){
        $this->question = $question;
    }   

    function output(){
        echo "<p>Here is: $this->question</p>";         
    }
}   
$test = new DisplayQuestion("What's your question?");
$test->output();
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Please edit this question to indicate the full output as you indicated below. –  ctrahey Jul 9 '12 at 0:27
    
What version of PHP are you using? –  Deefour Jul 9 '12 at 0:29
    
PHP 5.2, that should be fine, right? –  ulliw Jul 9 '12 at 0:31
    
Does $test = new DisplayQuestion("What's your question?"); echo '<p>'.$test->question.'</p>'; output it right? –  inhan Jul 9 '12 at 0:34
    
No, that doesn't work either. –  ulliw Jul 9 '12 at 0:39

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I run that code perfectly well on my machine, which means there is another issue (it's not the code). Check your PHP logs as well as your HTTP server's error and access logs, and (on your development server) enable display_errors in your ini file and see what's going on.

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Nothing in the error logs :( All i get is "Here is:" but the property's value is missing, that's why I thought there is something wrong with the syntax. –  ulliw Jul 9 '12 at 0:18
    
So, your question says that it was a blank page... That's important information; especially since there were two other answers that have since been deleted which may have been accurate given this new information. –  ctrahey Jul 9 '12 at 0:20
    
I'm happy to undelete mine if it helps OP. –  Deefour Jul 9 '12 at 0:21
    
I'm not super confident, since I think he would get a syntax error if he had a version of PHP in which that syntax was not supported (the documentation clearly states that it is valid. Perhaps the answer above (re: PHP4) is accurate. –  ctrahey Jul 9 '12 at 0:22
    
really sorry about that. i meant blank for the property. I tried @deefour's syntax, but it didn't work either. –  ulliw Jul 9 '12 at 0:24

Try this:

class DisplayQuestion {
    public $question = "bug test";

    function __construct ($question){
        $this->question = $question;
    }   

    function output(){
        echo "<p>Here is: $this->question</p>";         
    }
}   
$test = new DisplayQuestion("What's your question?");
$test->output();

If you get "Here is: bug test", then your PHP version is less than 5 on your development server. In PHP 4, __construct is not recognized as a constructor so you would have to replace it with the following:

class DisplayQuestion {
    var $question;

    function DisplayQuestion ($question){
        $this->question = $question;
    }   

    function output(){
        echo "<p>Here is: $this->question</p>";         
    }
}   
$test = new DisplayQuestion("What's your question?");
$test->output();

Try to determine for sure which PHP version you have by running phpinfo() on your server.

share|improve this answer
    
The PHP4 version is not syntactically correct; variable scope is not supported in PHP4. public $question should be var $question. –  Deefour Jul 9 '12 at 1:44
    
You're completely right, I missed that. Thanks for pointing it out. –  akanevsky Jul 9 '12 at 2:57

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