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Basically, I have an exe app that is installed with priviledges (as in, the user presses the "Allow" button in Vista/Win7 UAC check), then the application starts and sets itself to auto-run so that the application will automatically restart again once the computer is rebooted (all done while elevated). The autostarting is requested by user, and is not enforced upon them.

This reboot instruction is set in the registry, in the CURRENT_USER section as below:

HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Run

The problem is, when the computer reboots, Windows will not let it execute unless the user re-authorizes it as an elevated process again (namely, a taskbar icon pops up in the tasktray saying the starting of my EXE/process was prevented, and the user is given the ability to launch the blocked app using menus on the icon in the tasktray).

I would like to add that I have the manifest file integrated into the EXE, so there is no problem on that end, and it registers its intentions accurately in the XML file.

Why does Windows do this by design? If an exe was authorized once, shouldn't that imply that it be authorized permanently?

But the main question I would like to ask is, how do I get around this? Imagine my users having to do this every single time the application needs to autorun?

Also, I would like to avoid the whole "your app shouldn't be running in elevated mode in the first place" argument/discussion, or the "no app needs elevated priviledges, you need to rewrite it" discussion. I can assure you that my app needs elevated priviledges (unfortunately). More details below if interested, not necessary to interpret or understand the question in this post, but included because I know some people will ask)...

Additional Unnecessary Reading:

...In fact, it requires it in 87% of all launches (depending on what users do), and for the 13% of times were it is not needed (that's, 13% of all launch instances, not 13% of users), I am developing a second exe where only that is launched first, and once an elevated feature is needed/requested, the elevated portion loads, saving 13% of all launches from hassling people with UAC nag, I will only have this ready by 2013. I'm going to all this work to split up functions that don't logically belong in different areas of the application - even with all this work, the problem I mentioned above does not get resolved (but rather, very slightly minimized or deferred).

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possible duplicate of How to run a program automatically as admin on Windows startup? –  spender Jul 9 '12 at 0:50

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I'm not sure why this was tagged with any programming language, and since it is really a ServerFault question it doesn't even belong here as far as I can tell.

The normal way to handle this is via Task Scheduler though, using the Run with Highest Privileges option. There are several published descriptions of the process involved, such as the old one at Make Vista launch UAC restricted programs at startup with Task Scheduler.

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Normally I wouldn't mark as answer or upvote posts suggesting things are off topic, or that post should be closed, or posted somewhere else, but I will make an exception for you since I've read your posts for years now! :) This is an SO question since I am looking for a programmable solution (ie: Task Scheduler) which will be incorporated in either a .NET or classic VB6 application. Thank you for your input. I am curious though, why has microsoft left this option open for developers (re Task Scheduler) while closing every other option for automated elevated restarting of app on reboots? –  Erx_VB.NExT.Coder Aug 23 '12 at 17:18
    
I would assume that this was made possible because people need some fairly easy way to do it and this method is one that can be secured. I.e. you can't create such a task without admin rights and elevation. BTW, there is another alternative: write the program as a Service and configure it with the credentials it requires to run properly. However both approaches require some manual system configuration, which is what makes this a non-developer question. I doubt these can be automated-away by doing them in your installer since they require credentials that can't be hardwired in. –  Bob77 Aug 23 '12 at 19:40
    
But you should be able to automate it as long as your user gives you admin rights, right? In that, if your instance is running in elevated mode, you can automate this configuration. –  Erx_VB.NExT.Coder Sep 1 '12 at 12:41
    
Probably so. You'd need to prompt for credentials though and work out using the APIs involved msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/windows/desktop/… –  Bob77 Sep 1 '12 at 17:22

Why does Windows do this by design? If an exe was authorized once, shouldn't that imply that it be authorized permanently?

That's a matter of opinion, but here's mine. If I needed Visual Studio to run elevated yesterday because I wanted it to regsvr32 a DLL, that doesn't prove that I want it to run elevated today on some different app.

But the main question I would like to ask is, how do I get around this?

I would use a service. The programming is non-trivial but that's how I would autorun an elevated process.

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Thanks for your comments, my logic was that, if a program wanted to drop a payload on your computer, it would have done it during the first elevated call instead of waiting for the second anyway. Also, that there is no option to remember the elevation (and option would have been preferred as opposed to always being No without choice). But I think I understand your point of view, every time a process runs elevated, there is the potential of that processes security holes from beign exploited to drop a payload, and in that respect, you may want to minimize elevated instances to need only times. –  Erx_VB.NExT.Coder Jul 9 '12 at 4:05
    
Also, I am using an API call in a VB6 app which (apparently) registers the current exe file "as a service" - is this what is required to run an exe as a service? Here is the call: regServ = RegisterServiceProcess(GetCurrentProcessId(), RSP_SIMPLE_SERVICE) --- or is there more to this then I am made aware? Is that call enough for a VB6 app to run as a service, or does it need to be re-programmed or changed structurally somehow (ie: created as an ActiveX Exe or something). Thanks for your input. –  Erx_VB.NExT.Coder Jul 9 '12 at 4:08
    
I would agree that a better approach would be to start your app unelevated, and elevate it only where users need to perform that action that needs elevation. At this point, you can exit the unelevated copy and leave only the elevated app running. Single .exe could be used to run in both modes. –  Alexey Ivanov Jul 9 '12 at 19:04
    
Too bad the RegisterServiceProcess API disappeared. In fact that makes me wonder why your program is able to run at all. However, it seems that there is an easier solution than programming a service. In the posting that spender linked to, one answer just uses the Task Scheduler. –  Windows programmer Jul 10 '12 at 1:23
    
@Windowsprogrammer I agree, what Im curious about is that why Windows chose to leave the Windows Task Scheduler open to allow for this, it is obviously intentional but they haven't provided another elegant way to do this, but allowing it to occur through what seems to me a bit of a hacky way - what do you guys think about this? –  Erx_VB.NExT.Coder Sep 1 '12 at 12:27

Either ask the user to turn off UAC or, as you already mentioned, redesign your application so that it elevates at the point elevation is needed, or run a service under system account and let it do the stuff which requires elevation.

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the problem is, i'm looking to avoid the additional questioning to users which is imposed upon restart every single time. Also, I am using an API call in a VB6 app which (apparently) registers the current exe file "as a service" - is this what is required to run an exe as a service? Here is the call: regServ = RegisterServiceProcess(GetCurrentProcessId(), RSP_SIMPLE_SERVICE) --- or is there more to this then I am made aware? –  Erx_VB.NExT.Coder Jul 9 '12 at 4:02
1  
Not sure but googling RegisterServiceProcess says on most sites that it's not available for NT based systems as it's not part of kernel32.dll anymore. I was thinking of creating a service which will run under system account and either start the executable which requires elevation or just holds the logic to all operations which would require elevation which is started/controled by an unelevated app using eg. WCF for communication between service and app. –  milter Jul 9 '12 at 9:50
    
Yep, you have to write a “real” service, and that service has to perform all the application logic. The app which auto-starts with user logon provides only UI and communicates to the service to perform the actions. –  Alexey Ivanov Jul 9 '12 at 18:58

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