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I just started using the TPL, and I want to make several calls to web services happen in parallel. From what I can gather, I see two ways of doing this.

Either Parallel.ForEach:

List<ServiceMemberBase> list = new List<ServiceMemberBase>(); //Take list from somewhere.
        Parallel.ForEach(list, member =>
            {
                var result = Proxy.Invoke(member);
                //...
                //Do stuff with the result
                //...
            });

Or Task<T>:

List<ServiceMemberBase> list = new List<ServiceMemberBase>(); //Take list from somewhere.
        ForEach(var member in list)
        {
            Task<MemberResult>.Factory.StartNew(() => proxy.Invoke(member));
        }

        //Wait for all tasks to finish.
        //Process the result objects.

Disregarding if the syntax is correct or not, are these to equivilant?

Will they produce the same result? If not, why? and which is preferable?

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3 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

For the code and use case you discuss, the two approaches are essentially equivalent.

Parallel.ForEach is useful when you have to partition an input range over several tasks (not applicable here), or is easier to synchronize the merging of results of several independent parallel operations (perhaps applicable here?).

In any case, you've correctly noted that in the Parallel.ForEach case, you don't have to manually synchronize the wait for completion, whereas if you manually start tasks, you do have to manage that synchronization yourself. In this case you would probably use something like Task.WaitAll(...).

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Thank you for the reply. I ended up using Parallel.ForEach and we see an improvement of around 25% in response time on our production - 16 core machines. I am guessing that most of the gain is in the parallel data processing, and not in the parallel calls to the web services themselves. –  Elad Lachmi Jul 10 '12 at 7:42
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Between the two pieces of code, Parallel.ForEach() will be more efficient, because it processes multiple items in a single Task, one after another.

But both of them will use as many threads as the ThreadPool will let them, which is not a good idea in this case. That's because the ThreadPool is good at guessing the optimal number of threads if you have very short, CPU-bound Tasks, which is far from the case here.

Because of that, I think the best option is to manually limit the degree of parallelism to a small number (you would have to measure to find out what number gives the best results):

List<ServiceMemberBase> list = …; //Take list from somewhere.
Parallel.ForEach(list, new ParallelOptions { MaxDegreeOfParallelism = 10 },
member =>
{
    var result = Proxy.Invoke(member);
    //...
    //Do stuff with the result
    //...
});

Even more efficient would be if you could execute the web service call asynchronously. Doing that and limiting the degree of parallelism at the same time is not very easy, unless you're on C# 5. If you were on C# 5 and if you also updated Proxy to support the Task-based Asynchronous Pattern (TAP), you could use TPL Dataflow to execute your code even more efficiently:

var actionBlock = new ActionBlock<ServiceMemberBase>(
    async member =>
    {
        var result = await Proxy.InvokeAsync(member);
        //...
        //Do stuff with the result
        //...
    }
    new ExecutionDataflowBlockOptions { MaxDegreeOfParallelism = 10 });
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Without reflecting or looking at the output I could not say for certain whether or not the two are the same; however I would doubt if they are that much different. The question about which is better is subjective depending on the scenario. To answer which is preferable is again very subjective, in the scenario you provided I would say that I would prefer the Parallel.ForEach because I can read it but if your development team are not used to the Parallel library then the second version is the one to go for.

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