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Using if and elseif, it is possible to easily perform the comparison below, but for learning purposes I am analyzing if it is possible to have the same functionality using switch.

If $x receives a positive or negative value, I get the right output, but if $x receives 0 (zero), I get the output 'Lower', but the right output should be 'Equal'.

Here is the code:

$x = 0;

switch($x)
{
    case ($x < 0):
        echo 'Lower';
        break;

    case ($x == 0):
        echo 'Equal';
        break;

    case ($x > 0):
        echo 'Bigger';
        break;
    default:
        echo 'Not found';
}

Is it possible to use a switch statement with expressions as cases?

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There is a "break;" missing after "echo 'Not found';" –  HighKickX Jul 9 '12 at 0:52
4  
No there isn't, as that's a default. –  Lusitanian Jul 9 '12 at 0:54
3  
@HighKickX, As it is the last option, isn't necessary to put the break; –  Marcio Simao Jul 9 '12 at 0:56
    
Why not use if and else if in this case? It's more readable, and require fewer lines of code. –  bfavaretto Jul 9 '12 at 0:57
    
@bfavaretto, It's just for learning purposes. You are right, in this specific case if and elseif would be much more indicated. My main question is to know if is possible to use sentences in each case of the switch –  Marcio Simao Jul 9 '12 at 1:00
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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You are effectively not matching numbers any more, but matching the boolean outcome.

Any positive or negative number casts to boolean true and only 0 casts to false, so basically for a positive or negative number you are comparing true to ($x < 0) or ($x > 0) and that gives the outcome you expect.

However, 0 casts to false and (0 == 0) is true so you will never have a match there. And as 0 < 0 is also false, your first statement in the switch is matched.

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Since 0 < 0 is false, why is first statement matched? The expression evaluates to false for both 0 < 0 and false < 0. –  nickb Jul 9 '12 at 1:12
    
@nickb, $x being 0, i understood this: 0 < 0 is false? As this expression is true it will be matched. –  Marcio Simao Jul 9 '12 at 1:18
1  
Very clear explanation, jeroen! Now i understood what is happening, many thanks! –  Marcio Simao Jul 9 '12 at 1:20
    
No... 0 < 0 is false –  nickb Jul 9 '12 at 1:23
3  
And when compared to the value passed into switch (0), false == 0, hence why it matches... –  ircmaxell Jul 9 '12 at 1:30
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switch($x) replace it with switch(true)

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Simple and intelligent suggestion, many thanks! –  Marcio Simao Jul 9 '12 at 1:31
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You are comparing if the $x is equal to test results, when $x = 0, the boolean value of $x is false. If it is different from 0, it is true. That's why you will always fall to the first test that returns false.

Try this instead :

$x = 0;

switch($x)
{

case 0:
    echo 'Equal';
    break;

case ($x < 0):
    echo 'Lower';
    break;

case ($x > 0):
    echo 'Bigger';
    break;

default:
    echo 'Not found';

}

I also read in the comments that you want to know if it possible to use sentences in each case of the switch. Yes it is possible :

$x = 0;

switch($x)
{

case ($x < 0):
    echo 'Lower';
    break;

case ($x > 0):
    echo 'Bigger';
    break;

case ($x <> 0):
    echo 'Equal';
    break;

default:
    echo 'Not found';

}

($x <> 0) will return false when $x = 0 and it will echo "Equal"

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1  
@grigore-turbodisel solution is much more simple, but I found it funny to stick with the switch($x) –  HighKickX Jul 9 '12 at 1:34
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