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nav ul {
}

nav ul li {
    margin-left: 7px;
}

nav.ul li a, a:link, a:visited {
    float: left;
    padding: 7px;
    margin-left: 15px;
    color: #ffffff;
    text-decoration: none;
    font-weight: bold;
}

nav ul li a:hover {
}

I only want the code above to style the elements within the <nav></nav>

Now however it does as well style the <a href=""> outside the nav element. How can I make sure it does what I want?

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1  
This: nav.ul li a, a:link, a:visited doesn't inherit. Should be: nav.ul li a, nav.ul li a:link, nav.ul li a:visited. –  Jared Farrish Jul 9 '12 at 1:31
1  
Ok, instead of adding this to all the answers I'll just put it here: There's a period (.) between nav and ul (it's nav.ul instead of nav ul) so that should be removed too, otherwise it's looking for a <nav class="ul"> when the earlier code sample has those as separate elements. –  nbsp Jul 9 '12 at 1:35
    
@nbsp - You are correct, the ` ` (space) selector is correct, the . (or subclass) is wrong and being perpetrated in most of the answers. –  Jared Farrish Jul 9 '12 at 1:37

5 Answers 5

up vote 5 down vote accepted

The rules as you have them, will only apply within a nav element, except this:

nav.ul li a, a:link, a:visited {

This rule applies to a:link and a:visited. You want this:

nav.ul li a, nav.ul li a:link, nav.ul li a:visited {
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I missed it as well, but the nav.ul is wrong. –  Jared Farrish Jul 9 '12 at 1:38

It's because this line is incorrect:

nav.ul li a, a:link, a:visited {

It should be:

nav ul li a, nav ul li a:link, nav ul li a:visited {

After the comma (,) the CSS is applying to all a tags as there's not preceding selectors specified. Also you've got a period (.) in the nav ul in the first part.

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Hopefully you get a few more upvotes. :) –  Jared Farrish Jul 9 '12 at 1:42

Change your rule:

nav.ul li a, a:link, a:visited

to:

nav.ul li a, nav.ul li a:link, nav.ul li a:visited

By omitting the nav.ul li part between the comma separation, you're effectively applying to to links outside of the nav.ul li.

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Your code is targeting a:link and a:visited without using descendent selectors. Using the following should fix your problem:

nav ul li a, nav ul li a:link, nav ul li a:visited {
    float: left;
    padding: 7px;
    margin-left: 15px;
    color: #ffffff;
    text-decoration: none;
    font-weight: bold;
}
share|improve this answer
    
There's a period (.) between nav and ul (it's nav.ul instead of nav ul) so that should be removed too, otherwise it's looking for a <nav class="ul"> when the earlier code sample has those as separate elements. –  nbsp Jul 9 '12 at 1:34
    
@nbsp - Good catch. –  Jared Farrish Jul 9 '12 at 1:35
1  
Ahh right. Just edited the answer. Thanks! –  mmontaruli Jul 9 '12 at 1:37

Make sure that all your selectors are preceded with nav ul li.

nav ul li a, nav ul li a:link, nav ul li a:visited {
    float: left;
    padding: 7px;
    margin-left: 15px;
    color: #ffffff;
    text-decoration: none;
    font-weight: bold;
}
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