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I can't think of a way to explain what I'm after more than I've done in the title, so I'll repeat it. Is it possible for an anonymous function called from within an object to have access to that object's scope? The following code block should explain what I'm trying to do better than I can:

function myObj(testFunc) {
    this.testFunc = testFunc;


    this.Foo = function Foo(test) {
        this.test = test;

        this.saySomething = function(text) {
            alert(text);
        };
    };

    var Foo = this.Foo;

    this.testFunc.apply(this);
}

var test = new myObj(function() {
    var test = new Foo();
    test.saySomething("Hello world");
});

When I run this, I get an error: "Foo is not defined." How do I ensure that Foo will be defined when I call the anonymous function? Here's a jsFiddle for further experimentation.

Edit: I am aware of the fact that adding the line var Foo = this.Foo; to the anonymous function I pass in to my instance of myObj will make this work. However, I'd like to avoid having to expose the variable inside the anonymous function--do I have any other options?.

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1  
Note that using named function expressions like this.Foo = function Foo(test) can cause significant issues in IE, just don't do it. –  RobG Jul 9 '12 at 3:25
    
@RobG: I was given that pattern by an answer to another question of mine, and wasn't aware that it caused a problem. Thanks for pointing that out! Are there any ways I can reproduce the behavior of named functions? (I.e. an object within an object) –  Elliot Bonneville Jul 9 '12 at 3:26
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3 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Should be this.Foo:

var test = new myObj(function() {
    var test = new this.Foo();
    test.saySomething("Hello world");
});

http://jsfiddle.net/grzUd/5/

Or alternatively using with:

var test = new myObj(function() {
    with (this) {
        var test = new Foo();
        test.saySomething("Hello world");
    }
});

http://jsfiddle.net/grzUd/6/

share|improve this answer
    
I know, and I should have clarified, but I'd like to avoid having to use this inside of the anonymous function for reasons I've highlighted in my updated question. –  Elliot Bonneville Jul 9 '12 at 2:29
    
Also, with? [shudder] –  Elliot Bonneville Jul 9 '12 at 2:30
1  
@ElliotBonneville cannot be done then. You can't expose a local scope outside of a local scope. Hence the point behind local scopes. –  Petah Jul 9 '12 at 2:33
    
Ah, okay. I guess I'll have to use one of the answers to this question, then. Thanks for clearing this up. –  Elliot Bonneville Jul 9 '12 at 2:38
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Change var test = new Foo(); to var test = new this.Foo();.

Edit: Or you could pass it as a parameter.

function myObj(testFunc) {
    this.testFunc = testFunc;

    var Foo = function (test) {
        this.test = test;
        this.saySomething = function(text) {
            alert(text);
        };
    };

    this.testFunc(Foo);
}

var test = new myObj(function(Foo) {
    var test = new Foo();
    test.saySomething("Hello world");
});
share|improve this answer
    
See my comment on Petah's answer. –  Elliot Bonneville Jul 9 '12 at 2:30
    
@ElliotBonneville You could only access Foo through this or pass it as a parameter as my edited answer. –  xdazz Jul 9 '12 at 2:35
    
Ah, okay. Thanks for the help! +1 –  Elliot Bonneville Jul 9 '12 at 2:39
    
@xdazz—you know this.testFunc.call(this, Foo) is the same as this.testFunc(Foo) don't you? –  RobG Jul 9 '12 at 3:07
    
@RobG Yep, you are write. Changed from this.testFunc.apply(this); made that code :) –  xdazz Jul 9 '12 at 3:11
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You seem to be confused about the difference between identifier resolution on the scope chain and property resolution.

Foo is a property of an instance of myObj (i.e. it's an object property). Calling new Foo will resolve Foo as a variable on the scope chain, which isn't the right place to look for it. That's why Petah's answer tries to use with, to put the object properties of the this object on the scope chain.

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No, I think I understand the concept properly, since my understanding of the whole "thing" is basically what you explained. However, I appreciate the time you took to answer my question. +1 –  Elliot Bonneville Jul 9 '12 at 3:16
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