Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Possible Duplicate:
Do interfaces inherit from Object class in java

package inheritance;
class A{
   public String display(){
       return "This is A!";
   }
}

interface Workable{
   public String work();
}

class B extends A implements Workable{
   public String work(){
      return "B is working!";
   }
}

public class TestInterfaceObject{
   public static void main(String... args){
      B obj=new B();
      Workable w=obj;
      //System.out.println(w.work());
      //invoking work method on Workable type reference

      System.out.println(w.display());
      //invoking display method on Workable type reference

      //System.out.println(w.hashCode());
      // invoking Object's hashCode method on Workable type reference
    }
}

As we know that methods which can be invoked depend upon the type of the reference variable on which we are going to invoke. Here, in the code, work() method was invoked on "w" reference (which is Workable type) so method invoking will compile successfully. Then, display() method is invoked on "w" which yields a compilation error which says display method was not found, quite obvious as Workable doesn't know about it. Then we try to invoke the Object class's method i.e. hashCode() which yields a successful compilation and execution. How is it possible? Any logical explanation?

share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by ahsteele, casablanca, Aqua, Luiggi Mendoza, Graviton Jul 9 '12 at 6:40

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

2  
All objects are Object in Java. That's probably why it can invoke methods of Object regardless. I think someone will quote from the standard to answer the question properly. –  nhahtdh Jul 9 '12 at 2:36
    
What methods are going to be invoked on an object depends upon the type of the reference which is referring to that object. Here, Workable type reference is referring to the object and How does Workable type reference know about the Object class's methods? –  PrashantGupta Jul 9 '12 at 2:52
    
Since everything is Object (except for primitive type), the type of reference doesn't really matter. I guess that's how it works. –  nhahtdh Jul 9 '12 at 3:00

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The intuitive answer is that regardless of what interface you refer to, the object implementing the interface must be a subclass of Object.

Section 9.2 of the JLS specifically defines this behaviour: http://docs.oracle.com/javase/specs/jls/se7/html/jls-9.html#jls-9.2

If an interface has no direct superinterfaces, then the interface implicitly declares a public abstract member method m with signature s, return type r, and throws clause t corresponding to each public instance method m with signature s, return type r, and throws clause t declared in Object, unless a method with the same signature, same return type, and a compatible throws clause is explicitly declared by the interface.

i.e. all interfaces are assumed to contain method signatures corresponding to methods in the Object class.

share|improve this answer
1  
+1 for linking to the JLS. :) –  David Conrad Jul 9 '12 at 3:39
    
Thank you. I would like to add more to this from JLS. It is a compile-time error if the interface explicitly declares such a method m in the case where m is declared to be final in Object. It follows that is a compile-time error if the interface declares a method with a signature that is override-equivalent (§8.4.2) to a public method of Object, but has a different return type or incompatible throws clause. This explains everything now. :) –  PrashantGupta Jul 9 '12 at 3:46

I think what's happening here is that even though w is known only to be Workable, all objects must derive from Object, so no matter what class w eventually is, it must have the Object methods.

share|improve this answer
    
What methods are going to be invoked on an object depends upon the type of the reference which is referring to that object. Here, Workable type reference is referring to the object and How does Workable type reference know about the Object class's methods? –  PrashantGupta Jul 9 '12 at 2:51
    
Because interfaces are classes, and all classes in Java inherit from java.lang.Object. So a Workable is an Object. –  David Conrad Jul 9 '12 at 3:38

The reason w.display() doesnt work is as you have save the reference as your interface type. The compiler only sees the methods exposed by the interface. If you were to call ((B)w).display() this would work. You are able to call hashCode() as the compiler is smart enough to know that interfaces are inherited by Objects and all object's superclass is Object

share|improve this answer
    
That's hashCode(), not getHashCode(). It's GetHashCode() in C#, though. –  David Conrad Jul 9 '12 at 3:39
    
I have a problem with mixing languages –  secretformula Jul 9 '12 at 11:03
    
It happens to me a lot, too. Just noting it. :) –  David Conrad Jul 9 '12 at 12:09

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.