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Baiscally I want to update a UILabel with results of a Core Data query. I have a UILabel with the following text "root has X credits". I want to search Core Data for entity "Account" then refine the search to look for just the "root" account, then refine the search for just the attribute "credit" located in the "root" account. Finally I want update the UILabel to read "root has 0 credits" (or however many credits the Core Data query describes.

So far I have the following code,

- (void)rootCreditAmount {
// Core Data - root credit amount
NSFetchRequest *request = [[NSFetchRequest alloc] init];

// define our table / entity to use
NSEntityDescription *entity = [NSEntityDescription entityForName:@"Account" inManagedObjectContext:_managedObjectContext];
[request setEntity:entity];

// filter results to just root user
NSPredicate *username = [NSPredicate predicateWithFormat:@"root"];

[request setPredicate:username];

// fetch records and handle error
NSError *error;
NSMutableArray *mutableFetchResults = [[_managedObjectContext executeFetchRequest:request error:& error] mutableCopy];

if (!mutableFetchResults) {
    // handle error.
    // should advise user to restart
}
NSLog(@"mutablefetchresults = %@",mutableFetchResults);
}

Needless to say this code is causing my app to crash at the moment.

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up vote 2 down vote accepted

Change your predicate statement to:

[NSPredicate predicateWithFormat:@"username == root"];

Change "username" to whatever your field name is. See here for more info about formatting predicate strings.

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Well thanks to the help of @skytz in chat.stackoverflow.com I was able to do what I needed. I ended up not using NSPredicate. The below method ended up solving my problem. But in the spirit of being a nice guy I'll give the credit to @melsam for the punctionality.

- (void)rootCreditAmount {
// Core Data - root credit amount
NSFetchRequest *request = [[NSFetchRequest alloc] init];

// define our table / entity to use
NSEntityDescription *entity = [NSEntityDescription entityForName:@"Account" inManagedObjectContext:_managedObjectContext];
[request setEntity:entity];

// fetch records and handle error
NSError *error;
NSMutableArray *mutableFetchResults = [[_managedObjectContext executeFetchRequest:request error:&error] mutableCopy];

if (!mutableFetchResults) {
    // handle error.
    // should advise user to restart
}

// refine to just root account
for (Account *anAccount in mutableFetchResults) {
    if ([anAccount.username isEqualToString:@"root"]) {

        NSLog(@"root credit = %@",anAccount.credit);

        _lblRootCredit.text = [NSString stringWithFormat:@"root has %@ credits.",anAccount.credit];
    }
}
}
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1  
This is really bad code. If you have 10,000 Account records in your database, it will fetch them all, when you only want one. Then it does linear search - where average cost is proportional to the size! Is this a joke from @skytz? – Daniel Thorpe Jul 9 '12 at 9:57

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