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I'm looking through some of the sample code for the Square Cam in Apple's sample code. I want to replicate some of it's functionality in a modern project using ARC. However, there are a ton of require statements such as:

BOOL success = (destination != NULL);
require(success, bail);

Which generates the compiler error:

Goto into protected scope.

My question is -- what is the appropriate way to handle such statements in a project using ARC?

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One more note -- I thought about simply flagging the controller not to utilize ARC but this wouldn't be ideal as working in the file would be difficult. Flagging third party libraries not to utilize ARC is fine but if it's part of the project implementation it would create a poor workflow as XCode still generates compiler errors / warnings while you have the file open. It'd be impossible to see actual warnings or errors while working in the source code for the given controller. –  Jim Jeffers Jul 9 '12 at 3:47
    
I get no such error. Where is your "bail" line? Or are you using the sample code as is? –  borrrden Jul 9 '12 at 3:57
    
Is there a reason why people are down voting my question? –  Jim Jeffers Jul 9 '12 at 7:15
    
@JimJeffers I am having the same problem with the same source code (thanks again Apple), and the below accepted answer does not seem applicable. Can you expound at all on how you fixed these errors? –  soleil Feb 25 '13 at 18:50

3 Answers 3

up vote 8 down vote accepted

I had the same problem (with the same sample code). The code looked like this:

BOOL success = (destination != NULL);
require(success, bail);

//Initialise some variables

bail:
//Deal with errors

I added braces around the block with the declarations to make their scope clear:

BOOL success = (destination != NULL);
require(success, bail);
{
    // *** Initialise some variables ***
}
bail:
{
    //Deal with errors
}

And it solved the problem for me. Through looking at this I also learned you can sometimes expand build errors to get more detail.

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Nice answer +1. Just adding braces to define scope is a great solution. Most answers say don't declare below goto, but one can with proper braces. –  braden Mar 10 '14 at 18:27

Apparently bail is in a scope with one or more __block variables; this is not allowed. See http://clang.llvm.org/compatibility.html#blocks-in-protected-scope for more. The solution proposed there is to limit the scope of the __block variable(s), by putting them in brace-delimited blocks. This may not work always; YMMV.

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I am adding some description for @Lewis42 answer.

If you don't put variable in its own scope, you bypass the initialisation of all variable after goto, and when ARC tries to clean it up, it will end up trying to release some random bit of memory.

If you don't want to put variables in their own scope make sure that any variable should not be declared below goto keyword.

Jumps to within __block variable scope

__block require special runtime initialization. A jump into the scope of a __block variable bypasses this initialization, leaving the variable's metadata in an invalid state.

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