Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Can someone give the simplest solution to convert an integer into a Array of Integer representing its relevant binary digits..

Input  => Output
1      => [1]
2      => [2]
3      => [2,1]
4      => [4]
5      => [4,1]
6      => [4,2]

One way is :
Step 1 : 9.to_s(2) #=> "1001"
Step 2 : loop with the count of digit
         use / and % 
         based on loop index, multiply with 2
         store in a array

Is there any other direct or better solution?

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Fixnum and Bignum have a [] method, that returns the value of the nth bit. With this we can do

def binary n
  Math.log2(n).floor.downto(0).select {|i| n[i] == 1 }.collect {|i| 2**i}
end

You could avoid the call to Math.log2 by calculating successive powers of 2 until that power was too big:

def binary n
  bit = 0
  two_to_the_bit = 1
  result = []
  while two_to_the_bit <= n
    if n[bit] == 1
      result.unshift two_to_the_bit
    end
    two_to_the_bit = two_to_the_bit << 1
    bit += 1
  end
  result
end

more verbose, but faster

share|improve this answer
    
Nice. Okay now I am convinced to upgrade to Ruby 1.9. I want my log2. –  Ray Toal Jul 9 '12 at 6:37
    
+1 ... But: Don't forget to filter out the zeros, for completeness :) –  Ray Toal Jul 9 '12 at 6:40
    
Thanks Frederick - Sure :).. –  Rakesh Jul 9 '12 at 6:42
1  
Oops, forgot about the zeroes. –  Frederick Cheung Jul 9 '12 at 7:04

Here is a solution that uses Ruby 1.8. (Math.log2 was added in Ruby 1.9):

def binary(n)
  n.to_s(2).reverse.chars.each_with_index.map {|c,i| 2 ** i if c.to_i == 1}.compact
end

In action:

>>  def binary(n)
>>       n.to_s(2).reverse.chars.each_with_index.map {|c,i| 2 ** i if c.to_i == 1}.compact
>>     end
=> nil
>> binary(19)
=> [1, 2, 16]
>> binary(24)
=> [8, 16]
>> binary(257)
=> [1, 256]
>> binary(1000)
=> [8, 32, 64, 128, 256, 512]
>> binary(1)
=> [1]

Add a final .reverse if you would like to see the values in descending order, of course.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Ray...Yossi suggested -> tap[] .. array = [].tap{|arr| n.to_s(2).reverse.chars.each_with_index {|c,i| arr << 2 ** i if c.to_i != 0}} –  Rakesh Jul 9 '12 at 6:31
1  
@Ray: yeah, the last one is the good (except a final reverse is missing?). Not sure we need to see the tries though ;-) –  tokland Jul 9 '12 at 7:33
    
You're right @tokland, the tries were stupid. Cleaned up now. –  Ray Toal Jul 9 '12 at 13:55
class Integer
  def to_bit_array
    Array.new(size) { |index| self[index] }.reverse!
  end

  def bits
    to_bit_array.drop_while &:zero?
  end

  def significant_binary_digits
    bits = self.bits
    bits.each_with_object(bits.count).with_index.map do |(bit, count), index|
      bit * 2 ** (count - index - 1)
    end.delete_if &:zero?
  end
end

Adapted from and improved upon these solutions found in comp.lang.ruby.

Some simple benchmarks suggest that this solution is faster than algorithms involving either base-2 logarithms or string manipulation and slower than direct bit manipulation.

share|improve this answer
1  
log2 version is faster for me. I think this will depend on how big the values you use it on are: how many 'wasted' bits are generated (this will also depend on 32 versus 64bit ruby) –  Frederick Cheung Jul 9 '12 at 13:37
    
@Frederick, good observation. Your new algorithm does beat mine according to Ideone's timer. –  Matheus Moreira Jul 9 '12 at 14:14

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.