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file a.html

    <div id=1>
       <?php Include "a.php?parameter=1" ?>
    </div>

    <div id=2>
       <?php Include "a.php?parameter=2" ?>
    </div>

file a.php:

    <? Php
    b;
    Function b {}
    ?>

calling a.html produces the error: "cannot redeclare b()" in div 2. The reason is easily understood - but what is the most efficient workaround?

share|improve this question
    
Why are you including same file twice ? –  Blaster Jul 9 '12 at 5:31
1  
what are you trying to do? –  QuickSilver Jul 9 '12 at 5:31
    
Why are you including the same code twice? A properly structured function should be able to handle multiple inputs and outputs. –  RobB Jul 9 '12 at 5:32
    
best to use include_once –  diEcho Jul 9 '12 at 5:44

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Including another PHP file doesn't fire off a new HTTP request. You cannot pass parameters to the included file like that. The text inside the quotes must resolve to a file on disk, including the ?parameter=1 part.

If you want to pass parameters to the included file, keep in mind that the current scope is available to the included code. You can assign values to global/local variables and then use them within the included file.

// run.php

<?php
    $name = 'Bob';
    include 'inc.php';
?>

// inc.php

<?php
    echo "Hi, $name!\n";
?>

Update

You cannot declare the same function more than once, even when using include. Instead, include the file that declares the function at the top of your page once. Use require_once to ensure it happens only once and breaks if it cannot find the file. Then, anywhere you need the effects of the function, call it in your page's script without doing another include.

// run.php

<?php require_once 'sayhi.php'; ?>

<div id="1">
    <?php sayhi('Bob'); ?>
</div>
<div id="2">
    <?php sayhi('Frank'); ?>
</div>

// sayhi.php

<?php
    function sayhi($name) {
        echo "Hi, $name!\n";
    }
?>

This creates the desired output.

<div id="1">
    Hi, Bob!
</div>
<div id="2">
    Hi, Frank!
</div>
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks; that's very helpful. However, my question was phrased ambiguosly. My issue is not so much about passing the parameters, but the fact that the function gets illegally redeclared. Let's assume I call A.PHP and B.PHP to yield text to two different divs within the same FILE.HTML. If A.PHP and B.PHP contain the same function, an error will be thrown - or not? –  aag Jul 9 '12 at 6:50
1  
Yes, an error will be raised. You cannot declare two functions with the same name. Instead, declare the function in one file that's included once at the top and then call it wherever you need its effects, much as I did in the second example. –  David Harkness Jul 9 '12 at 16:52
    
See my update for a full example. Is this what you're looking for? –  David Harkness Jul 9 '12 at 16:58
    
Fantastic! That's very instructive and resolves the issue concisely and with admirable clarity! A million thanks! –  aag Jul 9 '12 at 17:52
    
A related thought. Does your example imply that it may be "best practice" to always wrap each PHP file into one big function that can be called from within divs, rather than calling it with a mess of GET_$ and argument stringed with ampersands? As has become painfully evident, I may have a PhD in molecular biology but my understanding of software is dismal... –  aag Jul 9 '12 at 18:00

When a file is included, the code it contains inherits the variable scope of the line on which the include occurs. Any variables available at that line in the calling file will be available within the called file, from that point forward. However, all functions and classes defined in the included file have the global scope.

Please view information on the include() function. The function b() should not have to be redeclared as it already exists. If you are trying to modify a variable that is set/passed to the function then you would include a parameter for the function that utilizes the corresponding variable.

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If you want to assign parameters to the file, then instead of including the file twice, you can do two things instead,

1) include without any parameters and call the functions with an argument that would do the action for you 2) Dont include it anywhere, rather execute it whenever you want using exec or popen and pass your parameters that acceps as argv :)

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Thank you. This is indeed a very good way to resolve this (and many other) situations! –  aag Jul 10 '12 at 5:51

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