Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a mulitThread Java application. In one method, there is a need to synchronize a ArrayList. Since arrayList is not a thread safe, so I have to use synchonization. The problem is that object which is type of ArrayList is not a member variable of the object. Prototype of the method is as follows:

public void simultaneousAccess(ArrayListWrapper aListWrapper){
  ArrayList list = aListWrapper.getList();
  //...Codes manipulate the list            
}

Due to mulitthreading, shall I use

A)

 public void synchronized simultaneousAccess(ArrayListWrapper aListWrapper){
         ArrayList list = aListWrapper.getList();
         //...Codes manipulate the list            
    }

Or

B)

public void simultaneousAccess(ArrayListWrapper aListWrapper){
     ArrayList list = aListWrapper.getList();
     Synchronized(list){
         //...Codes manipulate the list 
     }           
 }

From the performance test, neither works. But I donot know why?

Here comes whole source codes:

package com.juhani.prototype.sync;

import java.util.ArrayList;

public class ArrayListWrapper {
    public ArrayList<Integer> aList = new ArrayList<Integer>();

    public ArrayListWrapper(){
        Integer one = new Integer(1);
        Integer two = new Integer(2);
        Integer three = new Integer(3);

        aList.add(one);
        aList.add(two);
        aList.add(three);
    }
}

package com.juhani.prototype.sync;

import java.util.ArrayList;

public class TestClass {

    public int count_test=0;

    public synchronized void test(ArrayListWrapper listWrapper){        
        ArrayList<Integer> list = listWrapper.aList;  
        int temp = list.get(1)+1;
        list.set(1,temp);       
    }

    public void testBlock(ArrayListWrapper listWrapper){
        ArrayList<Integer> list = listWrapper.aList;  
        synchronized(list){
            int temp = list.get(1)+1;
            list.set(1,temp);     
        }
    }

}


package com.juhani.prototype.sync;

public class WorkerSyncObj extends Thread {

    ArrayListWrapper listWrapper = null;
    TestClass tc = null;
    int number;

    public WorkerSyncObj(int aNumber){
       number = aNumber;    
    }

    public void setListWrapper(ArrayListWrapper aListWrapper){
        listWrapper = aListWrapper;
    }

    public void setTestClass(TestClass aTc){
        tc = aTc;
    }

    public void run(){
        int i = 1000;
        for(int j=0;j<i;j++){
            tc.testBlock(listWrapper);
            System.out.println("Thread "+number+" is runing at loop "+j+" . index 1 value is:"+listWrapper.aList.get(1)); 
        }       
    }   
}

package com.juhani.prototype.sync.main;

import com.juhani.prototype.sync.ArrayListWrapper;
import com.juhani.prototype.sync.TestClass;
import com.juhani.prototype.sync.WorkerSyncObj;

public class TestMain {

    public static void main(String[] args){

        ArrayListWrapper list = new ArrayListWrapper();
        TestClass tc = new TestClass();

        WorkerSyncObj work1 = new WorkerSyncObj(1);
        work1.setListWrapper(list);
        work1.setTestClass(tc);
        WorkerSyncObj work2 = new WorkerSyncObj(2);
        work2.setListWrapper(list);
        work2.setTestClass(tc);
        WorkerSyncObj work3 = new WorkerSyncObj(3);
        work3.setListWrapper(list);
        work3.setTestClass(tc);

        work1.start();
        work2.start();
        work3.start();



    }

}
share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

In java, every object instance has an intrinsic lock (as well as corresponding class itself). Synchronzied keywork is actually use the intrinsic lock for exclusive access, i.e.

syncrhonized method(...) {...} 

is equal to

method(...) { 
this.intrinsicLock.lock(); 
...; 
this.intrinsicLock.unlock() }

And

synchronized( obj_ref ) { ... }

is equal to

obj_ref.intrinsicLock.lock(); 
{...} 
obj_ref.instrinsicLock.unlock();

So, syncrhonized the method is not right for the protection of list (the parameter). There are two problems if you use the synchronized( list): 1. The granularity of exclusive access seems a little gross 2. Every list access wherever in the whole program need to use "synchronized( list )" too. This is a protocol (for the exclusive acess).

That's the reason why Java library provide quite some concurrent data structures.

share|improve this answer

In the first case you lock on the this object while in the second on the list object. This might be a problem if you call the method from different objects but the list is the same. This is can be the reason of the exception in the first case.
Alternatively you could try some built-in concurrent types like Collections.synchronizedList or CopyOnWriteArrayList.

share|improve this answer
    
using Collections.synchronizatedList and CopyOnWriteArrayList is very good suggetion. I will try this also. –  user84592 Jul 9 '12 at 10:23
    
I have to correct my result. I tried both synchronization block, synchronization method. Neither works. Now I will try zeller suggestion. I added my source codes in the questions. –  user84592 Jul 10 '12 at 11:46
    
I have no idea then. Can you identify the line that throws the exception? I can't see any more concurrent writes for the list, only a concurrent read in your run method when you log. –  zeller Jul 10 '12 at 12:55
    
WorkerSyncObj.run calls tc.testBlock which has arraylist.set method. Is this concurrent writes for the list? –  user84592 Jul 11 '12 at 11:54
    
Concurrent, but synchronized, because testBlock makes the read+write operation atomic, there is only one thread at a given time that modifies the list, other threads are waiting outside. –  zeller Jul 11 '12 at 11:58

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.