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Sorry about the horrible title but I honestly have know idea what I want nor what is wrong...

Basically I have a struct (well I have 250+ structs but they all follow the same idea) that looks like this:

[StructLayout(LayoutKind.Explicit)]
public struct GenericPacket
{
    [FieldOffset(0)]
    public byte[] data;

    [FieldOffset(0)]
    public short packetid;
}

The issue is that a byte array is a reference type and a short is a value type and it won't allow the fieldoffset to be set to the same memory location...

I would really hate to have to remove all the structs I've written just to do it a different way. So here is my question, how can I use this in a way that works. Basically what I'm going to do is this:

socket.Receive(buff, 0, 0, SocketFlags.None);
GenericPacket packet = new GenericPacket();
packet.data = buff;
Console.WriteLine(packet.packetid);

It refuses to even compile as it doesn't want to generate the struct /:

Before anyone suggests other methods, the reason I am doing this is it needs ultra high speeds... I could use a ByteReader and other methods (eg. BitConverter) but it needs to be a tad faster than that...

I started with Bitwise shifts but I needed a more 'dynamic' way to do it because after I have a packet ID I then read it with another struct, for example:

[StructLayout(LayoutKind.Explicit)]
public struct _03k
{
    [FieldOffset(0)]
    byte[] data;

    [FieldOffset(0)]
    short packetid;
    [FieldOffset(2)]
    short @null;
    [FieldOffset(4)]
    int major;
    [FieldOffset(8)]
    int minor;
    [FieldOffset(12)]
    int build;
}

Instead of having to have a lot of inline "Bitwise shits" I simply want an easy AND very fast way of doing this... Seems I got the fast just not the easy /:

PLEASE HELP! Unsafe code is ok, but prefer a managed version too.

FAIL :(: Just remembered you can convert Value types to Reference types by boxing them (casting to type object). This does however remove the REAL return type and says it just is an object, is there anyway with XML Documentation that you can lie about the return type? DOESN'T WORK SADLY D:

UPDATE: OK, now I have:

public struct GenericPacket
{
    public short packetid;

    public static GenericPacket ReadUsingPointer(byte[] data)
    {
        unsafe
        {
            fixed (byte* packet = &data[0])
            {
                return *(GenericPacket*)packet;
            }
        }
    }
}

But its a bit annoying having to call a method everytime to convert it :( Anyone got any more suggestions?

Thanks, JD

share|improve this question
    
What is blahblah? int? SocketFlags? SocketError? –  Batuu Jul 9 '12 at 7:37
    
Yes... Fine I'll edit it -.- –  jduncanator Jul 9 '12 at 7:39
    
This sort of thing might work in C, but I don't think there's a way to do it in .NET - I don't think there are any guarantees on what the byte layout of, e.g. a short is, or endianness. –  Damien_The_Unbeliever Jul 9 '12 at 7:42
    
@Damien_The_Unbeliever I am managing all the Endianness myself so I know its right ^_^ What I can't seem to do is get a byte array to work properly with non reference types... I have heard somewhere that you can use unsafe code with a fixed byte but can't get it to work properly. For example see the answer for this: stackoverflow.com/questions/10299978/… –  jduncanator Jul 9 '12 at 7:46

4 Answers 4

You just want to convert the first two bytes of the array to a short, how does that pose any performance problem?

packetid = ((short)data[0]  << 8) | data[1];

Or the other way around if you want the other endianess.

EDIT:

So you want to parse multiple fields. Don't reinvent the wheel, then. Use Google's Protocol Buffers, it's very fast and efficient, and I doubt you'd encounter performance issues with it. Here's a .NET port.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, but this is the first step in a multi step equation, this simple allows me to get the packetID and compare it in a switch to see the layout for another struct I have... I have updated the question. –  jduncanator Jul 9 '12 at 7:59
    
Thanks for the protobuff idea, friend of mine told me of it this morning, might be worth looking into after we get this thing running! Thanks anyway bro :) –  jduncanator Jul 9 '12 at 8:12

I've just found you can use fixed araays in structs:

[StructLayout(LayoutKind.Explicit)]
unsafe struct Union
{
    [FieldOffset(0)]
    public short x;
    [FieldOffset(0)]
    public fixed byte y[2];
}

The initialization:

var u = new Union();
byte[] y = new byte[2]; //your original array here
int len = y.Length;
unsafe
{
    fixed (byte* s= y)
    {
        byte* source = s;
        byte* dest = u.y;
        for (int i = 0; i < len; i++)
        {
            *dest++ = *source++;
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
1  
That's nice, but how does help the OP? He did not mention that he needs a 'fixed size array'. –  leppie Jul 9 '12 at 8:27
    
Yea, but it doesn't implicitly casting byte[] to byte* –  jduncanator Jul 9 '12 at 8:27
    
How do I use this? I just get errors when trying to assign a byte[] to the byte*! Please help as it seems the only way of doing this :( –  jduncanator Jul 10 '12 at 1:29
    
As it's a fixed array, you cannot assign a pointer or reference to it. You have to copy the source array content to the fixed array byte after byte. –  Bartłomiej Szypelow Jul 11 '12 at 8:41

In this particular example you could do this:

[StructLayout(LayoutKind.Explicit)]
struct byte_array
{
    [FieldOffset(0)]
    public byte byte1;

    [FieldOffset(1)]
    public byte byte2;

    [FieldOffset(0)]
    public short packetid;
}

But in general, Buffer.BlockCopy is probably a better solution.

share|improve this answer
    
Yeah, I know it works, but the byte arrays lengths differ and I don't want to have to be setting hundreds or thousands of byte's when an array is made for this kinda thing. Regarding the BlockCopy, the issue isn't getting the bytes into the array in the struct, its getting it to compile as it won't let you overlap memory locations for arrays and value types. –  jduncanator Jul 9 '12 at 7:49
up vote 0 down vote accepted

What I finally settled on was a struct with an implicit conversion operator that called the ReadByPointer method.

public struct GenericPacket
{
    public short packetid;

    public static GenericPacket ReadUsingPointer(byte[] data)
    {
        unsafe
        {
            fixed (byte* packet = &data[0])
            {
                return *(GenericPacket*)packet;
            }
        }
    }

    static public implicit operator GenericPacket(byte[] value) 
    {
        return GenericPacket.ReadUsingPointer(value);
    }
}

This allows you to do the following:

GenericPacket packet = bufferFromReceive;

Thanks -jD

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