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First thing my app does is checking for "su" since it's necessary for the app to work. Even though it sometimes work, often after typing "killall packageName" in the terminal. I've done a simple test application and I can't get it to work every time. Code where it happens:

String[] args = new String[] { "su" };
Log.v(TAG, "run(" + Arrays.toString(args) + ")");
FutureTask<Process> task = new FutureTask<Process>(new Callable<Process>() {
    @Override
    public Process call() throws Exception {
        return Runtime.getRuntime().exec(args);
    }
});
try {
    Executors.newSingleThreadExecutor().execute(task);
    return task.get(10, TimeUnit.SECONDS);
} catch (Throwable t) {
    task.cancel(true);
    throw new IOException("failed to start process within 10 seconds", t);
}

Complete project: https://github.com/chrulri/android_testexec

Since this app does nothing more than running exec() in the first place, I cannot close any previously opened file descriptors as mentioned in another stackoverflow question: http://stackoverflow.com/a/11317150/1145705

PS: I run Android 4.0.3 / 4.0.4 on different devices.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

3c71 was right about open file descriptors. In my case, it was the AdMob SDK which caused the problems since it was sometimes (re-)loading the Ads from the web at the sime time I tried to call exec(..) leaving me hanging in a deadlock.

My solution is to fork a "su" process ONCE and reuse it for all commands and load the Ads AFTER forking that process.

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To use Runtime.exec safely you should wait for the process to finish and consume the output and error streams, preferably concurrently (to prevent blocking): http://www.javaworld.com/javaworld/jw-12-2000/jw-1229-traps.html

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Please look at the example code and the stackoverflow link I've posted. The problem is that exec(..) never returns. The FutureTask is simply a wrapper to detect this kind of problem. If it wouldn't hang there, the FutureTask wouldn't be needed at all. –  chrulri Jul 9 '12 at 8:37
    
PS: this code just starts the process, handling (e.g. reading streams and doing stuff) is done afterwards. Have a look at the complete test app on github (link is posted) –  chrulri Jul 9 '12 at 8:53
    
Had a quick look. Are you sure your FutureTask is actually being executed? Can't remember the exact details but I think you need to execute it with an ExecutorService –  Martin Wilson Jul 9 '12 at 9:04
    
Yes, this was a mistake in the test app (bad copy pasta from the real app). I fixed this now but the problem of hanging exec(..) call is still persistent on random occasions. –  chrulri Jul 9 '12 at 9:52
    
That is strange indeed. Are you absolutely certain the blocking is actually in the Runtime.exec() method? –  Martin Wilson Jul 9 '12 at 10:37

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