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Tomcat has a database connection pool (DBCP) to make requests faster.

In my app, too many connections are being used for too long, I suspect a leak (connection not being properly closed) and I need to find out where is the leak.

QUESTION: How to find out the name of each thread which is using a connection?

Preferably live JMX MBean, but other tips are welcome too. Showing each thread's stack trace or class name would be acceptable too.

Note: I am not looking for an MBean that shows the DBCP settings. I want to see what uses each connection.

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2 Answers 2

Such a bean unfortunately does not exist.

What you can do is enable the logAbandoned setting in your DBCP configuration. Look at the documentation for Apache Commons-DBCP ( http://commons.apache.org/dbcp/configuration.html) for details: you can use all of the configuration options there in your <Resource> element in Tomcat.

logAbandoned will tell you where a Connection was checked-out of the pool that wasn't returned in a timely way. That can indicate a Connection leak, or just queries that are long-running.

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+1 Thanks for the tip! I created a tool based on this idea, please see my answer. –  Nicolas Raoul Aug 6 '12 at 5:58
up vote 3 down vote accepted

Tipped by Christopher's answer, I created a tool to monitor borrowed/released connections:

https://github.com/nicolas-raoul/Commons-DBCP-monitoring

It monitors Commons DBCP usage and allows one to create such graphs:

enter image description here

enter image description here

It makes it super easy to identify which threads are holding connections for a long time.

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1  
So, no "accept" love for me? Oh, well... –  Christopher Schultz Aug 6 '12 at 14:46

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