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This is the main class

 class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        MyArray fruit = new MyArray(-2, 1);
        fruit[-2] = "Apple";
        fruit[-1] = "Orange";
        fruit[0] = "Banana";
        fruit[1] = "Blackcurrant";
        Console.WriteLine(fruit[-1]);       // Outputs "Orange"
        Console.WriteLine(fruit[0]);        // Outputs "Banana"
        Console.WriteLine(fruit[-1,0]);     // Output "O"
        Console.ReadLine();
    }
}

and here is the class for the indexer:

class MyArray
{
    int _lowerBound;
    int _upperBound;
    string[] _items;

    public MyArray(int lowerBound, int upperBound)
    {
        _lowerBound = lowerBound;
        _upperBound = upperBound;
        _items = new string[1 + upperBound - lowerBound];
    }

    public string this[int index]
    {
        get { return _items[index - _lowerBound]; }
        set { _items[index - _lowerBound] = value; }

    }

    public string this[int word, int position]
    {
        get { return _items[word - _lowerBound].Substring(position, 1); }
    }
}

So, multiDimensional indexer in defined in the 'Class MyArray'

I am not able to understand how this is working when we pass '-1' as the value of 'word' to the indexer. The value for '_lowerbound' is '-2'. So it means, the value for the return should be _items[-1 - (-2)], which makes it _items[1].

But actually it is pointing to -1 index of fruits i.e. Orange.

Please clear my doubt.

share|improve this question
    
I dont understand your doubt. What are you expecting? –  leppie Jul 9 '12 at 8:42
    
what is multi-dimensional here? MyArray is a 1 dimensional array of string with a flexible base. –  Jodrell Jul 9 '12 at 8:47
    
-1 index of fruits is stored in 1 index of _items. The indexer translates the index into fruits, which is based on _lowerBound and could be 0-based, 1-based, or based on some other positive or negative integer, into an index on _items, which is 0-based like all arrays in C#. –  David Conrad Jul 9 '12 at 8:48
    
Both of the indexers are consistently applying - _lowerBound to any provided index position. So anything accessed via [-1] will be the same thing accessed via [-1,...]. –  Damien_The_Unbeliever Jul 9 '12 at 8:49
2  
@DavidConrad Seriously... I read the question, did you read my comment? The OP seems confused as to why Orange is returned, hence I was asking what he expected - which isn't stated. If we can understand the expectation and the reasoning he places behind it, we can understand where the confusion comes in. –  Adam Houldsworth Jul 9 '12 at 9:02

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

This is you private array _items:

   0     1     2     3
┌────┐┌────┐┌────┐┌────┐
│ Ap ││ Or ││ Ba ││ Bl │          
└────┘└────┘└────┘└────┘  

This is how it appears using the indexer:

  -2    -1     0     1
┌────┐┌────┐┌────┐┌────┐
│ Ap ││ Or ││ Ba ││ Bl │          
└────┘└────┘└────┘└────┘  

The value for _lowerbound is -2.

So it means, the value for the return should be _items[-1 - (-2)], which makes it _items[1].

That's correct.

But actually it is pointing to -1 index of fruits i.e. Orange.

That's wrong. It is pointing to _items[1], i.e. Orange.

Indexers are a simple way to permit a class to be used like an array. Internally, you can manage the values presented in any fashion you wish.

_items is a zero-based array with the same length as the created MyArray object.

The indexer is just interpreting the index number supplied and map it against this underlying array.

share|improve this answer

This isn't a multi-dimensional array in the expected sense, it just looks like one.

Updated Answer:

It looks like you expect: fruits[-1, 0] to point to the same element as fruits[1] = "Blackcurrent". Unfortunately this isn't the case as in both instances you are actually using custom indexers, both of which modify your provided index values.

The custom indexers on MyArray are mutating the index values you are supplying before they get to the underlying string[]. This is where the confusion has come in, you are not taking into account the code in the custom indexers:

public string this[int index]
{
    get { return _items[index - _lowerBound]; }
    set { _items[index - _lowerBound] = value; }

}

public string this[int word, int position]
{
    get { return _items[word - _lowerBound].Substring(position, 1); }
}


Old Answer:

Don't confuse array index in primitive arrays with indexing on custom implementations. You can do whatever you like with the latter, it is basically just syntactic sugar over method calls. You have an indexer that takes an int, that means any valid int is a valid argument for the indexer (though maybe not for the underlying primitive array string[]).

Your index implementation subtracts lowerBound from both the get and the set, so the same index supplied at the set will result in the same element as the index supplied for the get.

The second indexer taking two parameters is doing the same index modification so will result in the same element (Orange)...

Where is the confusion? Are you expecting the second parameter of...

public string this[int word, int position]

...to somehow affect what element is returned? It is used in the Substring call of the element returned by the ordinal word - lowerBound, it does not affect what element is chosen.

share|improve this answer
    
It seems the sugar is a little too sweet in this case. –  Jodrell Jul 9 '12 at 9:13
    
i had confusion on this and is clear now: in the above example in the main function, Console.writeline(fruit[-1,0]), we are passing '-1' as the value for 'word' parameter to the index. The resultant return value should be : _fruits[-1 - (-2)], which is _fruits[1]. If we look at array fruits, at the index 1, we have 'Blackcurrant'. But the output was "O" as it actually pointed to Orange. As, @lesderid and Maarten explained it that the .net array index starts from 0, so this means that _fruits[1] should point to "Orange". Apple is the first value of the index i.e. 0. –  Mohit Jul 9 '12 at 9:29
    
i was EXPECTING that this index should work the way it is defined i.e. it should start from -2 instead of .net array index 0. –  Mohit Jul 9 '12 at 9:32
    
@Mohit "_fruits[-1 - (-2)], which is _fruits[1]" - this is incorrect. The modification happens after the fruits indexer has been called, this is more accurate: _items[-1 - (-2)], which is _items[1]. –  Adam Houldsworth Jul 9 '12 at 9:32
    
@Mohit But it does work the way it is defined. If you specify _fruits[-2] you get "Apple"... you are confusing array-style access on custom indexers to array access on primitive .NET arrays, where the index implementation is not custom. _fruits is not a primitive array. –  Adam Houldsworth Jul 9 '12 at 9:33

The index calculated in this[int] and this[int,int] is the index as you need it in the _items array, and this array starts at index 0. So the second item there is indeed index=1, which is Orange.

Update: _items[-1] doesn't exist, this array starts at index 0.

share|improve this answer

Arrays in .Net languages, like C#, can't have items with negative indexes.

To circumvent this, this array class moves the item with the lowest index (index of _lowerBound) to 0. So when you access the internal array, you'll have to substract _lowerBound from the index, so it will never try to pass a negative index.

This is why -1 will actually be at 1 in the internal array, because -1 - (-2) equals to 1.

Edit: I'm not sure why you think there should be a difference between your class' two indexers. They both use _items[index - _lowerBound] to access the underlying .Net array. Other than the String.Substring call, there's no difference between the two indexers.

Try changing the code of the second indexer so it calls the first indexer, you'll see it returns the same character. (http://ideone.com/sFmDo)

share|improve this answer
    
But this is custom indexer logic and entering a negative value into a primitive .NET array (such as string[]) throws an IndexOutOfBoundsException. I'm not sure I understand what you are getting at here. –  Adam Houldsworth Jul 9 '12 at 8:53
    
It will never actually pass a negative index to the .Net array, as long as the index isn't lower than _lowerBound. It's basically just moving the bounds. –  lesderid Jul 9 '12 at 8:54
    
Yeah I know that, I think the OP does too - there seems to be some confusion over wanting the index value to mean something different for one of the indexers, and something else for the other indexer. –  Adam Houldsworth Jul 9 '12 at 8:56
    
I edited my answer to clarify. I'm not sure what the OP is getting at... –  lesderid Jul 9 '12 at 8:58
    
I don't think anyone is really sure :-) –  Adam Houldsworth Jul 9 '12 at 8:59

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