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I am new to the C language. Please, could someone tell me why I am always getting zero as output when comparing differing strings using my own implementation of strcmp?

I wrote the function xstrcmp to compare two strings: if they are equal, then it returns 0; otherwise, it returns the numeric difference between the ASCII values of the first non-matching pair of characters.

    #include<stdio.h>

    int xstrcmp(char*,char*);

    int main()
    {   
        int i;
        char string1[]="jerry";
        char string2[]="ferry";
        i=xstrcmp(string1,string2);
        printf("difference=%d\n",i);
        return 0;
    }

    int xstrcmp(char*p,char*q)
    {
        int m;
        while(*p!=*q)
        {
             if((*p=='\0')&&(*q=='\0'))
                break;
          p++;
          q++;
        }
        m=(*p)-(*q);
        return m;
    }
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5  
Hint: Take a closer look at this line: while(*p!=*q) –  Mysticial Jul 9 '12 at 8:47
    
while(*p==*q) will come here..thnx for the hint mate –  amadeus Jul 9 '12 at 9:02
    
You have asked several questions but haven't accepted any answers, mate. –  Jim Balter Jul 9 '12 at 21:19

2 Answers 2

You loop until you find equal chars, then you subtract them -- so of course the result is always 0.

Also, the condition inside the loop will always fail ... if the chars aren't equal, they can't both be NUL.

That should be enough for you to fix your code.

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The reason why you get zero always is that your while loop while(*p!=*q) means that the loop will execute as long as the characters are NOT same.

The exit from loop will happen when *p and *q have the same value.

Hence the return value, which is m=(*p)-(*q); will always be zero.

while (*p == *q) /* as long as they have same value, loop; otherwise exit */
{
      p++; /* increment the pointers */
      q++;
}
return (*p)-(*q);

would be the way to go.

share|improve this answer
    
This has undefined behavior for equal strings. –  Jim Balter Jul 9 '12 at 21:20

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