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#define classAnum 2;
#define classBnum 3;

class Base
{
  virtual int open()=0;
  virtual int close()=0;
}
class A:public Base
{
 virtual int open();
 virtual int close();
};

class B:public Base
{
 virtual int open();
 virtual int close();
}

int main()
{
    A classA[classAnum];
    B classB[classBnum];

openAnyClass(1);
CloseAnyClass(2);   
}

I want to achieve functionality like this.

openAnyClass(1);
CloseAnyClass(2); 

these 2 functions should be able to call open() and close() from any of class A and B.

openAnyClass(1) would call the open() function of 1st object in the array of either classA or classB.

open() --> will have different implementation in class A and class B. and open() in classA may be called from multiple clients and max. no. of clients is # defined.

At a time only one open() from any of the classA or classB is called. I dont want to have several copies of the same code.

with just one function i want call open() of any of class A and any of client.

for Eg: in the below statement i want to call open() of class A of client1. the param to openAnyClass(int) indicates the client Id. This could also meant classB[1].open();

'openAnyClass(1) = classA[1].open();'

What is the best way of doing this?

share|improve this question
    
It is not possible to have different implementation of the same method - what's the point of multiple open()? If you pass pointer/reference to Base (upcasted from an instance of either class A or class B) when calling openAnyClass, then you'll be able to call open or close on this pointer/reference and "automagically" the right method will be called(either A::open() or B::open() depending on the "real" class) –  Alexander Putilin Jul 9 '12 at 10:05
2  
@user1511617 What does the parameter of openAnyClass() and closeAnyClass() mean? –  Eitan T Jul 9 '12 at 10:13
    
so classA is an array of A, and same for classB. and calling openAnyClass(1), means call open() on all instances of A, and closeAnyClass() means call close() on all instances of classB. well if this is the case, the question is really complicated formulated. –  Moataz Elmasry Jul 9 '12 at 10:24
    
@user1511617 Why does openAnyClass(1) calls classA[1].open() and not classB[1].open()? –  Eitan T Jul 9 '12 at 13:43
    
No Eitan, i am passing an int param to openAnyclass(), which indicates the instance that i want to open. Similarly i can pass the object whose open() i want to call. –  Fancier Jul 9 '12 at 14:02

3 Answers 3

This is the reason for having a command base class that you derive from; that way you can have a pointer or reference to a class and call the open/close method in the derived classes via the virtual functions.

So if you had

Base *generic_class_pointer = new class A();

generic_class_pointer->open();

The generic_class_pointer->open() would invoke the code defined in class A.

What you're trying to do with two arrays that store objects, one for classes A and one for classes B is not required, you can have a single array that refers to classes of type Base and access via this.

The original code is not really a good way of working, it's better to do this via a list (eg. stl::vector).

Base* class_storage[StorageSize];

int openAnyClass(int id)
{
    if (id < 0 || id >= StorageSize || class_storage[id] == 0)
        return 0; // or other error indication
    else
        return class_storage[id]->open();
}
int CloseAnyClass(int id)
{
    if (id < 0 || id >= StorageSize || class_storage[id] == 0)
        return 0; // or other error indication
    else
        return class_storage[id]->close();
}


int main()
{
    memset(class_storage,0,sizeof(class_storage));

    class_storage[1] = new A();
    class_storage[2] = new B();

    openAnyClass(1);
    CloseAnyClass(2);   
}

The above code isn't a complete solution, for example the original doesn't have virtual destructors which is a good practice to always use - in case a derived class needs to do cleanup.

Also the deletion of the objects allocated into the class_storage isn't freed on my sample. It doesn't matter at global level because they will be freed upon exit, however most of the time you need to manage everything acquired via new() otherwise you'll get memory leaks.

share|improve this answer
    
The memset call is superfluous as elements of the global array are automatically default-initialized. Despite, Base class_storage[StorageSize] = {0}; would be better to present to newbies anyway. –  mloskot Jul 9 '12 at 10:47
1  
If you need to allocate the objects with new, then remember to either delete them, or use smart pointers to manage them. They'll almost certainly need virtual destructors too. –  Mike Seymour Jul 9 '12 at 11:16
    
openAnyClass(1) would call the open() function of 1st object in the array of either classA or classB. –  Fancier Jul 9 '12 at 13:12
    
that's what virtual functions are for; in the example it is exactly what will happen when calling class_storage[1]->open(...); –  Richard Harrison Jul 9 '12 at 13:18

so classA is an array of A, and same for classB. and calling openAnyClass(1), means call open() on all instances of A, and closeAnyClass() means call close() on all instances of classB. well if this is the case, the question is really complicated formulated

anyways there's no no known out of the box method to do that. you have to iterate on all elements of the array and call open() or close(). alternatively you can use boost foreach http://www.boost.org/doc/libs/1_39_0/doc/html/foreach.html or implement your own foreach method

share|improve this answer

If I understand your question correctly, you want to call different implementations of a pure virtual function. Assuming you have provided implementations of class A and class B, you should be able to make use of polymorphism and call open()/close() from a pointer/reference to a Base instead of A or B.

Instead of creating two arrays for A and B, you can create only one array of Base pointers.

Example:

Base* base[basenum];

void openAnyClass( const int i )
{
   if( i < basenum && i >=0 && base[i] != NULL )
       base[i]->open();
}

int main(void)
{
   base[0] = new A();
   base[1] = new B();
   ...
   openAnyClass(1);
   closeAnyClass(2);

   for( int i = 0 ; i < basenum ; i++ )
      delete base[i];
}

As a side note, I think it would be better to make use of open and close functions like these:

void openAnyClass( Base& base );
void closeAnyClass( Base& base );

Rather than using a global variable to store the objects and passing an index, pass the pointer/reference of the object to the function and the function would call the appropriate method(whether the method of A or B).

share|improve this answer
    
If you're going with this approach, better create a vector<Base*> base; rather than a C-style array, and modify the delete-loop to iterate while i <= base.size(). Right now you might be deleting unallocated pointers... –  Eitan T Jul 9 '12 at 11:45

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