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Recently we encountered a performance problem from a piece of code that generates an XML. Thought of sharing the experience here. This is slightly long, please bear with me.

We prepare a simple XML with a number of items. Each item can have 5-10 elements. The structure is something like this:

<Root>
    <Item>
        <Element1Key>Element1Val</Element1Key>
        <Element2Key>Element2Val</Element2Key>
        <Element3Key>Element3Val</Element3Key>
        <Element4Key>Element4Val</Element4Key>
        <Element5Key>Element5Val</Element5Key>
    <Item>
    <Item>
        <Element1Key>Element1Val</Element1Key>
        <Element2Key>Element2Val</Element2Key>
        <Element3Key>Element3Val</Element3Key>
        <Element4Key>Element4Val</Element4Key>
        <Element5Key>Element5Val</Element5Key>
    <Item>
</Root>

The code that generates the XML was (in simplified form as global functions) :

void addElement(std::string& aStr_inout, const std::string& aKey_in, const std::string& aValue_in)
{
    aStr_inout += "<";
    aStr_inout += aKey_in;
    aStr_inout += ">";
    aStr_inout += "Elemem1Val";
    aStr_inout += "<";
    aStr_inout += aValue_in;
    aStr_inout += ">";
}

void PrepareXML_Original()
{
    clock_t commence,complete;
    commence=clock();

    std::string anXMLString;
    anXMLString += "<Root>";

    for(int i = 0; i < 200; i++)
    {
        anXMLString += "<Item>";
        addElement(anXMLString, "Elemem1Key", "Elemem1Value");
        addElement(anXMLString, "Elemem2Key", "Elemem2Value");
        addElement(anXMLString, "Elemem3Key", "Elemem3Value");
        addElement(anXMLString, "Elemem4Key", "Elemem4Value");
        addElement(anXMLString, "Elemem5Key", "Elemem5Value");
        anXMLString += "</Item>";


        replaceAll(anXMLString, "&", "&amp;");
        replaceAll(anXMLString, "'", "&apos;");
        replaceAll(anXMLString, "\"", "&quot;");
        replaceAll(anXMLString, "<", "&lt;");
        replaceAll(anXMLString, ">", "&gt;");
    }
    anXMLString += "</Root>";

    complete=clock();
    LONG lTime=(complete-commence);
    std::cout << "Time taken for the operation is :"<< lTime << std::endl;
}

The replaceAll() code will replace the special characters with the encoded form. This is given below.

void replaceAll(std::string& str, const std::string& from, const std::string& to) 
{
    size_t start_pos = 0;
    while((start_pos = str.find(from, start_pos)) != std::string::npos) 
    {
        str.replace(start_pos, from.length(), to);
        start_pos += to.length();
    }
}

In the minimal example, I have encoded 200 items. But, in the actual situation this could be more. The above code took around 20 seconds to create the XML. This was far beyond any acceptable limit. What could be the problem? And how to improve the performance here?

Note : The usage of the string class doesn't make much difference. I tested same logic with another string implementation from MFC CString and I got the similar(much worse) observation. Also, I don't want to use any DOM XML parsers here to prepare the XML in a better way. The question is not specific to XML.

share|improve this question
    
What is the output of the profiler that you ran, where exactly does it point to as being the bottleneck? allocation? copy of data? –  PlasmaHH Jul 9 '12 at 11:23
    
@PlasmaHH: I didn't use any profiler, just from the function in-out times, I was able to conclude that each item addition takes time. Please see the answer below. With the below modification, I was able to improve the performance dramatically. –  PermanentGuest Jul 9 '12 at 13:14

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

If you can estimate length of of result string (anXMLString) before creation of content, then you could allocate enough buffer space for the string. When the buffer is big enough, then re-allocation and copying (of target string) won't happen.

This way:

std::string anXMLString;
anXMLString.reserve( size );

I'm not sure about std::string, does it need to search appending point, or does in keep length of string in memory.

share|improve this answer

I realized that the problem could be due to the fact that the same string is getting longer and longer and this results in the following: 1. The string concatenations become more expensive as the string grows 2. The character replacements happen in the bigger strings as the loop progresses and becomes increasingly slower.

To solve this, I used a temporary string to get the individual item XML encoded and towards the end of the loop I appended this small XML to the main one. The modified method is given below.

for(int i = 0; i < 200; i++)
{
    std::string anItemString;  // Create a new string for the individual Item entry
    anItemString += "<Item>";
    addElement(anItemString, "Elemem1Key", "Elemem1Value");
    addElement(anItemString, "Elemem2Key", "Elemem2Value");
    addElement(anItemString, "Elemem3Key", "Elemem3Value");
    addElement(anItemString, "Elemem4Key", "Elemem4Value");
    addElement(anItemString, "Elemem5Key", "Elemem5Value");
    anItemString += "</Item>";


    replaceAll(anItemString, "&", "&amp;");
    replaceAll(anItemString, "'", "&apos;");
    replaceAll(anItemString, "\"", "&quot;");
    replaceAll(anItemString, "<", "&lt;");
    replaceAll(anItemString, ">", "&gt;");

    anXMLString += anItemString;   // Do all the operations on the new string and finally append to the main string.
}

This improved the performance of the XML creation and the time taken was just 17 milliseconds!

So, the lesson I learned is that when creating a bigger result, split it into sub-operations, gather the results of the sub-operations in new strings and append once to the global result. I'm not sure if this is already a pattern or a name for this.

Since StackOverFlow provided an option to share the experience in terms of Q&A, I thought of utilizing it. Any comments/improvements are welcome.

share|improve this answer
    
I am not sure, but I think that when you plan to do a lot of string concatenation, it is more performant to use a stringstream instead of of the + operator of string. But I never did a test to check the difference. –  W. Goeman Jul 9 '12 at 11:21
    
@W.Goeman It obviously depends on the implementation of each, but the implementations of stringstream I'm familiar with actually insert by appending to an std::string, so they won't improve performance. –  James Kanze Jul 9 '12 at 12:36
    
Another thing that might improve things would be to use std::vector<char> rather than std::string. std::vector requires an exponential growth pattern, in order for push_back to have amortized constant complexity; many early implementations of std::string used linear growth, and became very, very slow when the size of the string became very large. (As I say, this might make a difference. Or might not: I don't know what happens too much in current string implementations.) –  James Kanze Jul 9 '12 at 12:39
    
@JamesKanze : Thanks for this info... –  PermanentGuest Jul 9 '12 at 13:15
    
@JamesKanze, thanks for the info. I suppose I confused with StringBuilder from Java, where the difference is certainly there. –  W. Goeman Jul 9 '12 at 13:47

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