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Is there any way to set the life cycle of a static variable - ie: how long it's kept alive before being reset? I was hoping there may be an attribute which can be applied.

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3  
What do you mean (variables don't get reset - you application does) and what have you tried? –  CodeCaster Jul 9 '12 at 11:34
    
Could you give us a context in which you're using this static variable? –  Nathan White Jul 9 '12 at 11:38
    
A static variable is just that - a variable. It does not "being reset" until you decide to reset it. –  dasblinkenlight Jul 9 '12 at 11:42
3  
@dasblinkenlight: correct, but in ASP.NET it's also reset automatically when the application (re)starts (f.e. when the application pool recycles). –  Tim Schmelter Jul 9 '12 at 11:47
3  
You've tagged this asp.net - a (mostly) server-side framework - AND wpf - a desktop framework. Application lifecycle is a very different thing between these two contexts. What is the actual situation you are asking about? –  AakashM Jul 9 '12 at 11:51

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Static members are associated with the type itself, not with an instance of the type. Therefore their lifecycle is limited to the timing and ordering of their creation, and they don't get "reset" by instances of the type.

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The lifetime of a value in a Static variables is the same as it's containing AppDomain. Ie. if you get a new AppDomain (because your IIS application restarts), you get a new copy of the static variable.

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In my case, as I'm using ASP.NET, the item in question should remain 'live' for the lifecycle of one request, so after thinking about it the HttpContext["Items"] collection would be best. Eg, instead if:

    private static SomeObject _books;
    protected static SomeObject Books
    {
        get
        {
            if (_books == null) {
                _books = new SomeObject();
            }
            return _books ;
        }
    }

    protected static SomeObject AVariable
    {
        get
        {
            SomeObject books = HttpContext.Current.Items["books"] as SomeObject; 
            if (books == null) {
                books = new SomeObject();
                HttpContext.Current.Items["books"] = books;
            }
            return books;
        }
    }
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A static variable is held for the lifespan of the application and shared between all threads. It is only reset when the application restarts (a web.config change for example).

If this is for something like caching I'd suggest setting a timer to update the value at regular intervals.

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I would caution against this. This could make debugging very hard if there is an issue with this variable. Especially if another developer is coming in behind to troubleshoot. You are better off using an instance variable. –  tsells Jul 9 '12 at 11:39
    
I agree this could be hard, it would be very dependent on the context of the problem. If an instance variable could be used then I agree that would be far simpler. My answer was trying to answer how to expire a static variable - if a simpler option is available then I would take that one. –  Liath Jul 9 '12 at 11:43

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