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I want to set DriverID column of Driver Table to 5000, 5001 ,....

For this purpose I write this script :

use WeighbridgeDB
GO

DECLARE @NewDriverID int;
SET @NewDriverID = 5000;

DECLARE Driver_Cursor CURSOR FOR 
SELECT DriverID FROM Driver
FOR UPDATE;

OPEN Driver_Cursor;

FETCH NEXT FROM Driver_Cursor

WHILE @@FETCH_STATUS = 0
BEGIN
    UPDATE Driver SET DriverID = @NewDriverID WHERE CURRENT OF Driver_Cursor;
    SET @NewDriverID += 1;
    FETCH NEXT FROM Driver_Cursor
END

CLOSE Driver_Cursor;
DEALLOCATE Driver_Cursor;
GO

But the While loop doesn't stop and the value of @@FETCH_STATUS is always 0. I think the Cursor rebuild itself since update occur on table or something.

How to correct this situation?

thanks.

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2  
I guess you are missing out INTO after fetch next from driver_cursor –  Prashant Lakhlani Jul 9 '12 at 11:41
    
@PrashantLakhlani - you don't need INTO. It means that the row will be sent to the client of the connection instead. And since the OP isn't trying to use any value from the current row, it's not obviously wrong. –  Damien_The_Unbeliever Jul 9 '12 at 12:51

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You don't need a cursor for this anyway (generally speaking try and avoid these in TSQL except for very few cases)

WITH T AS
(
SELECT *,
       ROW_NUMBER() OVER (ORDER BY DriverID) + 4999 AS NewDriverID
FROM Driver
)
UPDATE T SET DriverID = NewDriverID
share|improve this answer

You might do it like this:

UPDATE Driver
SET
    Driver.DriverID = d.NewDriverID 
FROM
(
    select 
        ROW_NUMBER() Over (ORDER BY DriverID) + 5000 AS NewDriverID,
        Driver.DriverID 
    from Driver 
) AS d
WHERE Driver.DriverID = p.DriverID 

There is almost never a reason to use a cursor.

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