Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have some GeometryModel3D balls in a Viewport3D, Some of them are visible and some of them are hidden by a blue cube. (Althouth the image below is in 2d lets pretend that all the objects are 3D)

I want to determine wich of the red balls can be seen and which are hidden.

How can I do this ?

enter image description here

share|improve this question
    
Do you want to know if a ball is partially hidden? Or you need a binary test for them? –  higuaro Jul 9 '12 at 13:34
    
h3nr1x - if it's only partially hidden it's not considered as hidden for me. –  Erez Jul 9 '12 at 21:16
    
Are the sphere primitives stored as pair {center, radius} or as a model mesh (in case that you're storing them as model-meshes, are you storing their center and radius)? Are the cube primitives stored as bounding-boxes? Are you using orthographical or perspective projection? (I need the info to elaborate on the solution) –  higuaro Jul 9 '12 at 23:33
    
Thanks h3nr1x - I use MeshGeometry3Ds. If it helps I can store their center and radius, and I'm using PerspectiveCamera. –  Erez Jul 10 '12 at 7:46

1 Answer 1

This problem is also known as Occlusion Culling, although you're interested in counting the occluded primitives. Given the conditions of your scene, a brute force approach to solve this problem (given that you're using perspective projection) is the following pseudocode:

occludedSpheresCount = 0
spheres = {Set of spheres}
cubes = {Set of cubes}
normalizedCubes = {} 

# First, build the set of normalized cubes (it means, 
# take the cubes that are free in space and transform their  
# coordinates to values between [-1, -1, -1] and [1, 1, 1], they are the same
# cubes but now the coordinates are laying in that range 
# To do that, use the 

       ProjectionMatrix

projectionMatrix = GetProjectionMatrix(perspectiveCamera)
for each cube in cubes do 
    Rect3D boundingBox = cube.Bounds()
    Rect3D normalizedBBox = projectionMatrix.transform(boundingBox)
    cubes_normalized.add(normalizedBBox)
end for

# Now search every sphere, normalize it's bounding box
# and check if it's been occluded by some normalized cube
for each sphere in spheres do
    Rect3D sphereBBox = sphere.Bounds() 
    Rect3D normalizedSphere = projectionMatrix.transform(sphereBBox)
    for each normalizedCube in normalizedCubes do
         x0 = normalizedCube.Location.X - (normalizedCube.Location.SizeX / 2)
         y0 = normalizedCube.Location.Y - (normalizedCube.Location.SizeY / 2)
         z0 = normalizedCube.Location.Z - (normalizedCube.Location.SizeZ / 2)

         xf = normalizedCube.Location.X + (normalizedCube.Location.SizeX / 2)
         yf = normalizedCube.Location.Y + (normalizedCube.Location.SizeY / 2)

         sx0 <- normalizedSphere.Location.X - (normalizedSphere.Location.SizeX / 2)
         sy0 <- normalizedSphere.Location.X - (normalizedSphere.Location.SizeY / 2)
         sz0 <- normalizedSphere.Location.X - (normalizedSphere.Location.SizeZ / 2)

         sxf <- normalizedSphere.Location.X + (normalizedSphere.Location.SizeX / 2)
         syf <- normalizedSphere.Location.X + (normalizedSphere.Location.SizeY / 2)

         # First, let's check that the normalized-sphere is behind the 
         # normalized-cube, to do that, let's compare their z-front values
         if z0 > sz0 then  
             # Now that we know that the sphere is behind the frontface of the cube 
             # lets check if it is fully contained inside the 
             # the normalized-cube, in that case, it is occluded

             if sx0 >= x0 and sxf <= xf and sy0 >= y0 and syf >= yf then
                  occludedSpheresCount++ 
                  # Here you can even avoid rendering the sphere altogether
             end if
         end if
    end for
end for

A way to get the projectionMatrix is using the following code (extracted from here):

    private static Matrix3D GetProjectionMatrix(PerspectiveCamera camera, double aspectRatio)
    { 
        // This math is identical to what you find documented for
        // D3DXMatrixPerspectiveFovRH with the exception that in
        // WPF the camera's horizontal rather the vertical
        // field-of-view is specified.
        double hFoV = MathUtils.DegreesToRadians(camera.FieldOfView);
        double zn = camera.NearPlaneDistance;
        double zf = camera.FarPlaneDistance;
        double xScale = 1 / Math.Tan(hFoV / 2);
        double yScale = aspectRatio * xScale;
        double m33 = (zf == double.PositiveInfinity) ? -1 : (zf / (zn - zf));
        double m43 = zn * m33;
        return new Matrix3D(
            xScale, 0, 0, 0,
                 0, yScale, 0, 0,
                 0, 0, m33, -1,
                 0, 0, m43, 0);
    }

The only drawback of this method is in the following case:

     +--------------+--------------+
     |             -|-             | 
     |           /  |  \           |
     |          |   |   |          |
     |           \  |  /           |
     |             -|-             |  
     +--------------+--------------+

or
          interception here
                  |
                  v
     +----------+--+--------------+
     |          | -|-             | 
     |         /|  |  \           |
     |        | |  |   |          |
     |         \|  |  /           |
     |          | -|-             |  
     +----------+--+--------------+

In which two intercepting cubes occlude the sphere, in that case, you have to build a set of sets of normalized cubes (Set{ Set{ cube1, cube2}, Set{cube3, cube4}, ... }) when two or more cube areas intercepts (that can be done in the first loop) and the contention test would be more complex. Don't know if that (cubes intercepting) is allowed in your program though

This algorithm is O(n^2) because is a brute force approach, hope this could give you a hint for the definitive solution, if you're looking for an efficient-more general solution, please use something like the Hierarchical Z Buffering

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks h3nr1x, I didn't succeeded to convert your pseudocode to c#,WPF, so I don't know if it's the correct answer. –  Erez Jul 15 '12 at 12:32

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.