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I am using getJSON to get data from a text file on my server I am providing absolute URL in getJSON request

var server="http://abc.com/text.json"
$.getJSON(server,function(data){
    console.log(data);
})

so when I access the site with URL http://abc.com/ I get the JSON values proper but when i access the same site with URL http://www.abc.com/ it shows error

Origin http://www.abc.com is not allowed by Access-Control-Allow-Origin.

both URL pointing to the same page then why the getJSON is behaving differently

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4 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

you can use

var server = window.location.href.slice(window.location.href.indexOf('?') + 1).split('&'); 
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Basically http://abc.com/text.json and http://www.abc.com/text.json are recognized as different domain by the browser, even if they point towards the same resource in your backend.

So you get into trouble with the same origin policy, when trying to access a resource from another domain.

If you want both URLs to work, you can switch to using a JSONP approach. That works independent from this policy.

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First off, it is a bad idea to have separate domains serving the same content. This is for two reasons: the first is the Same Origin Policy, which prevents scripts from accessing a different domain; the second is that Google and other search engines penalise duplicate content. Duplicating content across domains, as you do here, will have that effect. Neither browsers nor search engines consider www.example.com and example.com to be the same domain.

Ultimately, you need to correct this, so that all pages are served from the same domain.

In the meantime, you can just make sure that scripts always access the current domain, whatever that is:

var server="/text.json"
$.getJSON(server,function(data){
    console.log(data);
});

Omitting the domain means the current domain is implicitly used.

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The source of your trouble is the same origin policy. Domains have to exactly match.

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