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EDIT: After removing the UB (good spot, I missed it), the times are more or less identical. Will flag a moderator to delete it.

These two functions are identical except for the fact that foo has the return inside the if, on both branches, whereas goo has a single return at the end:

int foo()
{
    static int x = 0;
    if ( x )
    {
        x > 2 ? x = 0 : ++x;
        return x-1;
    }
    else
    {
        x++;
        return x-1;
    }
}
int goo()
{
    static int x = 0;
    if ( x )
    {
        x > 2 ? x = 0 : ++x;
    }
    else
    {
        x++;
    }
    return x-1;
}

The numbers are there just so optimizations don't kick in too hard and the function call isn't optimized away. Compiled with full optimization on MSVS 2010.

Calling the function 4000000000 times, sampled 10 times, foo was always faster:

  • foo - 8830 ms average
  • goo - 8703 ms average

The difference is small, but it's there. Why? Also, why doesn't the compiler optimize them to the same thing?

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1  
Have you checked the assembler output? –  larsmans Jul 9 '12 at 13:20
4  
You are writting code to bother the optimizer, and then you wonder about the differences? If you care to understand your particular example, read the generated assembly, but note that this might not reflect at all what would happen in any other function. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Jul 9 '12 at 13:22
3  
And btw., what should the ++x in x = x > 2 ? 0 : ++x do? I'm not being pedantic; I really don't know what the expected behavior of that expression is and whether it may interfere with the optimizer. –  larsmans Jul 9 '12 at 13:23
3  
@larsmans: Good point, that expression is undefined behavior. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Jul 9 '12 at 13:25
1  
@larsmans the UB fix changed everything. –  Luchian Grigore Jul 9 '12 at 13:33
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closed as not a real question by Luchian Grigore, Matthieu M., K-ballo, interjay, juanchopanza Jul 9 '12 at 14:20

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3 Answers

Have a look at the assembler output, there might be a jump to the end of the function in the first branch of goo().

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Yes but that first branch is never taken. –  TerryE Jul 9 '12 at 13:23
1  
I'm thinking it has something to do with branch prediction and pipelining. –  Chris Dargis Jul 9 '12 at 13:25
1  
@TerryE x is static, so it is incremented in the second brunch and thus the first branch is called in a next function call. –  Torsten Robitzki Jul 9 '12 at 13:39
    
@TorstenRobitzki, yup, I also realised that after posting the comment, but too late to edit it :oops: -- Mindfart –  TerryE Jul 9 '12 at 13:47
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I'm assuming that it's because having the return in every if , the moment the operation is done, foo will return the calculated variable.

goo, even thought it does the same thing, except for the two returns, will still have to check the else statement.That uses some time (extremely small) but as you can see, it is mesurable.

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4  
What do you mean it still has to check the else statement? –  Luchian Grigore Jul 9 '12 at 13:23
    
I don't think the else needs to be checked. First, there is no "checking" an else. Else is true if everything before it was false. Also, if the if condition is true, the else block never runs, so I don't see any difference in work. Like the others said, the assembly code may be different. –  Brandon Dec 31 '13 at 3:19
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In case of foo end braces of "if" and "else" will not be executed. After the return

statement the control will got o the end brace of function directly.

Thats why it will take less time for foo.

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1  
Naren, a core doesn't execute "braces". It executes instructions. However you are right in a way in that some compilers align branch targets on 4/8 byte boundaries to help improve instruction caching, and having an extra target as well as the extra code for the first return x+1 could effect the timing. –  TerryE Jul 9 '12 at 13:34
    
I know this is not executed, but I tried this by giving break points and the execution went directly to the end brace of function.... You also try with break point and check. –  Narendra Jul 9 '12 at 13:39
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