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Hello so I'm trying to get the thread context of a 64bit process on the system. I've tried using both a 32 bit and a 64 bit solution with the correct functions. But I always end up with the error '0x57', Invalid parameter. A short sample from the 64bit code.

// open a handle to the thread
HANDLE hThread = OpenThread(THREAD_GET_CONTEXT | THREAD_SET_CONTEXT | 
THREAD_SUSPEND_RESUME | THREAD_QUERY_INFORMATION, FALSE,
        atoi(argv[1]));
if(hThread  == NULL) {
    printf("Error opening thread handle.. 0x%08x\n", GetLastError());
    return 0;
}

// suspend the thread
if(Wow64SuspendThread(hThread ) == -1) {
    printf("Error suspending thread.. 0x%08x\n", GetLastError());
    CloseHandle(hThread );
    return 0;
}

// get the thread context
WOW64_CONTEXT orig_ctx = {WOW64_CONTEXT_FULL };
if(GetThreadContext(hThread , &orig_ctx) == FALSE) {
    printf("Error  0x%08x\n", GetLastError());
    CloseHandle(hThread );
    return 0;
}

I doubt the handle is wrong, the code worked correctly on 32bit processes. I would greatly appreciate any help or advice. Thanks in advance!

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Which of the functions fails? –  hmjd Jul 9 '12 at 13:32
    
So you did try Wow64GetThreadContext()? –  alk Jul 9 '12 at 13:42
    
Sorry that I didn't clarify, WoW64GetThreadContext fails with error 'error '0x57', Invalid parameter'. And so does GetThreadContext. –  Erik Swansson Jul 9 '12 at 14:13
    
just to add, OpenThread and Sleeping the thread works and returns success but again, GetThreadContext AND WoW64GetThreadContext fails. It's like there is something wrong with the context supplied in the call. –  Erik Swansson Jul 9 '12 at 14:25
    
Ok so it seems like compiling as a 64bit app but using GetThreadContext instead of Wow64GetThreadContext and CONTEXT instead of WOW64_CONTEXT, actually works. At least the call doesn't fail. I can use the context to access 64bit registers even though they are shown as errors in the code but it compiles fine. Though after a call to GetThreadContext basiclly all registers are empty or 0 and I tried crashing the process by setting Rip to 0 and SetThreadContext but it doesn't crash. So it compiles fine, not 100% sure its working. –  Erik Swansson Jul 9 '12 at 15:03
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1 Answer

The following code when compiled as a 64-bit application successfully retrieves the thread context of a 64-bit thread.

// threadcontext.cpp : Defines the entry point for the console application.
//

#include "stdafx.h"
#include <Windows.h>
#include <tchar.h>


int _tmain(int argc, _TCHAR* argv[])
{
    // open a handle to the thread
    HANDLE hThread = OpenThread(THREAD_GET_CONTEXT | THREAD_SET_CONTEXT | 
    THREAD_SUSPEND_RESUME | THREAD_QUERY_INFORMATION, FALSE, _ttoi(argv[1]));

    if(hThread  == NULL) {
        printf("Error opening thread handle.. 0x%08x\n", GetLastError());
        return 0;
    }   

    // suspend the thread
    if(SuspendThread(hThread ) == -1) {
        printf("Error suspending thread.. 0x%08x\n", GetLastError());
        CloseHandle(hThread );
        return 0;
    }

    // get the thread context
    CONTEXT orig_ctx = { 0 };
    orig_ctx.ContextFlags = CONTEXT_FULL;
    if(GetThreadContext(hThread , &orig_ctx) == FALSE) {
        printf("Error  0x%08x\n", GetLastError());
        CloseHandle(hThread );
        return 0;
    }

    return 0;
}

One thing to notice is that there is no mixing of regular calls and Wow64 calls. The Wow64 calls are for getting the information about 32-bit process running on a 64-bit system.

The other correction is the setting of the ContextFlags member. You were trying to set it during initialization but the ContextFlags member is not the first member in the structure.

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